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Mother of missing Yorktown oil rig worker: 'Adam was my baby'

By adriana_acosta
April 23, 2010 at 10:01 p.m.
Updated April 22, 2010 at 11:23 p.m.

Donovan Weise, Adam Weise's nephew, cries on the shoulder of a friend at the candlelight vigil for Adam Weise in Yorktown on Friday.

YORKTOWN - Adam Weise's family emerged from solitude on Friday night to join a community candlelight vigil.

About 100 family members, friends and former classmates gathered at 8 p.m. in Yorktown Presbyterian Fellowship Hall on Church Street.

Weise is among 11 workers who went missing after an oil rig exploded off the Louisiana coast.

The U.S. Coast Guard contacted Arlene Weise, the missing man's mother, on Friday to notify her they suspended the search. Chances of finding the missing workers three days after the explosion is slim, the mother learned.

"Adam was my baby, just 24 years old," the teary-eyed mother of four said.

Deacon Mark Black opened the night's vigil with a prayer.

"We still don't know," the deacon said in an apparent attempt to solicit hope where there seemed to be little.

The somber group sang songs, including "Amazing Grace," and shed tears.

The missing oil rig worker's mother and grandmother, Nelda Winslette, then walked to the front of the group and lit their candles.

"He could brighten anybody's day," said Cindy Shelton as she clutched a photo of her missing boyfriend.

Weise is one of two area workers who went missing after the explosion. Bay City's Jason Anderson is also unaccounted for.

Like its Yorktown counterpart, Bay City held out for hope on Friday.

"It is hard to face," said Irene Solnik, a physician specialist for the Matagorda Center for Education Services. "The family needs to know where he is at."

In Yorktown, the Weises discussed favorite memories.

"He loved to hunt, fish and he was a prankster," Arlene Weise, the mother, said.

Adam Weise graduated from Yorktown High School in 2005. He played football.

After high school, Weise immediately went to work on an oil rig, one of his older sisters, Sara Weise, said.

The family realized the dangers that lurk in this risky line of work. In the end, the Transocean Ltd. rig exploded 50 miles off-shore - washing away most hopes of recovering a lost son.

"The hardest thing is not having his body here for a burial," the mother said.

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