Editorial board opinion: Class delay was good decision

We think administration at the University of Houston-Victoria made the correct decision to delay classes for freshmen and sophomore students this fall because the dormitory for these students will not be ready for occupancy.

Mold has caused extra construction time on Jaguar Hall, the first residence hall for the university's first underclassmen. The hall, located in the 2700 block of East Houston Highway, had been a motel for numerous years before its purchase by the university.

Now, instead of Aug. 23, classes will begin Sept. 7, the day after the Labor Day holiday. UHV will make up the two weeks delay by extending the length of classes through the semester. All students will finish the fall semester at the same time on Dec. 10.

The alternative considered by UHV administrators was to house the students in hotels and motels, but no one place could accommodate the approximately 200 students expected this fall. And that would mean scattering the students throughout the city.

The decision not to house the students in various lodgings will save the university money and keep the students in one place when they begin entering Jaguar Hall on Sept. 5. As UHV President Tim Hudson mentioned, keeping the students safe is of primary concern, and transportation for the students would have been a nightmare if they were in different parts of the city.

"We have recruited a hardy, pioneering class of incoming underclassmen, from the Coastal Bend region, San Antonio, Houston, the Rio Grande Valley and beyond," Hudson said. "I have no doubt that this short hiatus will simply add to the many stories that will become the legend of the first-ever freshman class at UHV."

We agree. Such trials and tribulations are the stuff of tradition, and UHV is off to a good start, forging its traditions in its first year as a four-year destination university.

We are excited as professors, staff and administration must be about the beginning of this four-year university. We wish the university and its expansion success in the years to come.

This editorial reflects the views of the Victoria Advocate's editorial board.