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City considers household hazardous waste program

By DAVID TEWES
Aug. 19, 2010 at 3:19 a.m.


Recycling optionsDarryl Lesak, the city's assistant director of Environmental Services, said he's also continuing to look into curbside recycling.

"We've got to make sure it's feasible," he said. "It would be an extra charge because it's a new service."

Lesak said while Waste Management might take on the project, he can't envision it happening before next summer.

Program optionsHazardous waste that can be collected: TVs, computers, paint, batteries, gasoline, herbicides, pesticides, used oil, transmission fluid and medications

Monthly cost: 55 cents - 65 cents added to the monthly utility bill

How: By calling toll-free number to request the picked up

Getting rid of paint, pesticides and herbicides could soon become an easier task.

The city is considering adopting a program with Waste Management that would help residents dispose of those types of household hazardous materials.

"I personally think it's a great idea as far as keeping the hazardous waste out of the landfill and the environment in a professional manner," Council Member Gabriel Soliz said. "I think what we're doing is the proper thing for the sake of future Victorians."

Darryl Lesak, the city's assistant director of Environmental Services, said the city is considering working with Waste Management to adopt a household hazardous waste program.

Residential customers can call a toll-free number to have hazardous waste collected. A monthly fee of 55 to 65 cents would be charged for the service.

Residents would then be mailed a package for disposal of the hazardous waste material.

"They're going to pick up TVs, computers, paint, batteries, gasoline, herbicides, pesticides, used oil, transmission fluid and medications," Lesak said.

Council Member Joe Truman said he likes the idea, but will have to check with his constituents on the cost.

"I'm all for it," he said. "We really need to get those items out of our dump."

Lesak said he believes the service is needed.

"There is not a household in this city that does not have hazardous household waste of some kind," he said. "What are they doing with it?"

Lesak said people either recycle the material, save it for electronic waste day or dispose of it illegally. He said he hopes to bring the question back to the city council in October or November for a decision.

"I'm hoping Victorians will see this as a necessary sacrifice for keeping the water clean," Soliz said. "This is our legacy. This is what we will pass on to children."

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