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City to consider regulating sale of animals by street vendors

By DAVID TEWES
July 4, 2010 at 2:04 a.m.


ALSO ON THE AGENDA

The city council will also conduct a workshop that will include the water and wastewater budget proposal.

Lynn Short, director of public works, said the spending plan does not include increases in the water and sewer rates.

The budget would take effect Oct. 1.

Victoria resident Michael Welton doesn't like it when he drives down Navarro Street and sees animals being sold from commercial parking lots.

"They come from puppy mills and that type of thing," Welton said. "A number of those animals purchased out there have had parvo."

He said people sometimes compulsively buy animals from the parking lot vendors and they end up with sick pets that die or require expensive treatment. The animals also contaminate the grounds and other animals are then exposed to disease, he said.

City Attorney Thomas Gwosdz said he is prepared to recommend to the city council that might curb or stop the practice. That meeting will be at 5 p.m. Tuesday in the Council Chamber at 107 W. Juan Linn St.

"We already prohibit the sale of live animals on public streets," Gwosdz said. "We could expand that to include, say for example, the sale of live animals from a location visible from an arterial road or collector street."

The city requires people conducting outside sales to get outdoor sales permits or itinerant vendor permits. Gwosdz said, it's his opinion that people who sell animals from parking lots are required to get permits from the city.

But he said it's his understanding that hasn't been happening and he could clarify the regulations to ensure it's clear that includes the sale of animals.

Then the police could check on people to see if they received a permit. If not, the operation could be shut down, he said.

Welton said he's glad to hear the city may take action to stop what he believes is the inhuman treatment of animals.

"If you actually stopped and look at the animals they're selling, it's just a pathetic situation," he said. "It's basically a dumping ground for animals."

Welton also said the animals are typically tied with ropes, are put into hot cages, causing them needless suffering. That's a cruel way to market animals, he said.

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