Comments

  • Harley 103.

    Thank you. Thank you. thank you.

    Holly1.

    STOP Posting PERIOD !!!!!!!!

    June 23, 2010 at 2:04 a.m.
  • " not to sound cold but how much did this PARADE of 20 or less people (entries and watchers) cost the city of victoria. It seems that it'is not to important of an event here if only 20 TOTAL people showed up. ( except for the free food afterwards) If a culture can't support it's own heritage and history (good or bad) who else will? If I was the city of victoria I would cancel funding for next year due to the lack of interest from the public shown this year. Being of " yankee " birth I fail to see why it's such a big deal anyway. We have always held the position that all "MEN" are equal in my hometown as long as that equality is earned by honesty and hard work. It was never just bestowed on anyone with-out them earning it along with the respect due to equals. Nothing is free in this world it must be earned. Equality is achieved when everyone has to earn it and none are more equal than others. Being born rich is no short cut to equality, Respect still needs to be earned "

    holly101 , no disrespect , but what does money have to do with anything concerning this parade ?

    if a " culture " can't support it's own heritage " ? you may as well have said what you thought , it doesn't take a rocket scientists to read between the lines . Apparently you've been asleep for a few years adnhave forgotten that the "culture " you are speaking about were enslaved against their own free will to the degree in 1860 the slave population in the United States had grown to four million , i guess those people didn't deserve freedom unless they earned it right ?

    " you don't see what the big deal is " ? Juneteenth marks the anniversary when Texas slaves realized they were free 2 years after the fact !!! Imagine being in jail for two years and some one comes and lets you out , and they tell you by the way , you were released 2 years ago , we just didn't mention it , how would you feel . I'm sure it's not a big deal to you or alot of people , but to those few who attended the parade , it meant alot to them . And if i know the " culture " like i do , they gave Thanks to Jesus for having made it all possible . AND MOST IMPORTANTLY < " HE ATTENDED " , If two or more of you are gathered in my Name, I will be among you" , JESUS said that !!!

    June 21, 2010 at 9:59 a.m.
  • Holly1--

    Huh? Where did you get the idea that the City of Victoria is out money for parades? I read the article three times looking for the part that says the City of Victoria funded this.

    June 20, 2010 at 11:01 p.m.
  • not to sound cold but how much did this PARADE of 20 or less people (entries and watchers) cost the city of victoria. It seems that it'is not to important of an event here if only 20 TOTAL people showed up. ( except for the free food afterwards) If a culture can't support it's own heritage and history (good or bad) who else will? If I was the city of victoria I would cancel funding for next year due to the lack of interest from the public shown this year. Being of " yankee " birth I fail to see why it's such a big deal anyway. We have always held the position that all "MEN" are equal in my hometown as long as that equality is earned by honesty and hard work. It was never just bestowed on anyone with-out them earning it along with the respect due to equals. Nothing is free in this world it must be earned. Equality is achieved when everyone has to earn it and none are more equal than others. Being born rich is no short cut to equality, Respect still needs to be earned by actions and deeds. Anyone not willing to work for equality and earn the respect they want should not expect to be treated with respect or as equals to those who are.

    June 20, 2010 at 10:25 p.m.
  • Hundreds gather along parade route to commemorate historic day.By Naureen Khan AMERICAN-STATESMAN STAFF

    Updated: 10:30 p.m. Saturday, June 19, 2010

    Published: 7:27 p.m. Saturday, June 19, 2010

    Spirits and candy soared high in the air Saturday morning as hundreds braved the heat for the annual Juneteenth parade in East Austin.

    The state holiday commemorates the day in 1865 when Union soldiers landed in Galveston and read the Emancipation Proclamation to slaves, informing them of their freedom.

    "It's about our inheritance," said parade-goer Ella Hogg from Dallas, who was visiting a friend in Austin.

    The procession began with Civil War re-enactors dressed in Union uniforms followed closely by city officials, police officers and politicians, including Austin Mayor Lee Leffingwell and U.S. Rep. Lloyd Doggett, D-Austin.

    The youngest in the crowd seemed most interested in what the dignitaries were tossing out of their cars: SweeTarts, Tootsie Rolls, lollipops and other treats. The Austin Police Department distributed 700 pounds of candy donated by a charity, said Senior Officer Dennis Farris.

    The parade started at the corner of Martin Luther King Boulevard and Comal Street, continued along Chicon Street and Rosewood Avenue, and ended on Hargrave Street.

    The crowd favorites were the marching bands, drum lines, beauty pageant queens and preteen stomp troops who danced, sashayed and strutted along the mile-long route.

    Attendees set out lawn chairs, fanned each other and jockeyed for a spot in the shade for the 2½-hour affair. The smell of barbecue wafted through the crowds as Greater Mount Zion Baptist Church passed out free turkey legs and water bottles in the "spirit of kindness" exemplified by Juneteenth, The Rev. Sherwynn Patton said.

    "We're here to celebrate freedom and community and to be with each other and have a good time," said Adrienne Waites, 31.

    Parade organizers and police officials said the annual event went off without a hitch and was one of the best attended in years, although they could not provide exact numbers.

    For lifelong Austin resident Eddie Hill, 76, whose four children and 12 grandchildren were among the revelers, the celebration was about more than fun and games.

    "We've got to let them know the history behind this," he said.

    nkhan@statesman.com; 445-3663

    NOW THIS IS HOW YOU DO A CELEBRATION...AND A PARADE

    June 20, 2010 at 9:33 a.m.
  • Pink license plates?

    June 20, 2010 at 7:36 a.m.
  • Striking photo, great shot!

    June 19, 2010 at 11:03 p.m.
  • Anybody see any pink license plates on any of the entries?

    June 19, 2010 at 8:45 p.m.
  • One place in the story states Six entries and another states Four, so which was it?

    A crowd of less than ten? Would that be nine, eight, seven, six Or ? When there is a gathering of nine or fewer, I wouldn't exactly call that a crowd.

    In spite of all this, though, it is a shame that not more people were involved in participating in the celebration parade. There's always talk of "nothing to do" and "honor us, honor us" and yet when there is an opportunity to do just that the response is pitiful.

    June 19, 2010 at 7:18 p.m.