Comments

  • Born2beme.

    Still you didn't address those who look like Illegals? Will their rights be upheld? Your last comment is still based on your indifference beause you fail to bring up polential voilations of Hispanic Americans.

    May 26, 2010 at 12:19 a.m.
  • The Mexican Govt does the same thing as the AZ law. Every State should follow the new law. There is no profiling and it will help the U.S

    May 25, 2010 at 2:56 p.m.
  • popalott56, it sounds like you boycotted school!

    May 25, 2010 at 9:44 a.m.
  • read a article that hispicanes, latios,an I will show them the respest ,of not calling them:: mexicans::are asking an saying ,that they should BOYCOTT all white bussiness,,DUE TO THE IMINAGERATION LAW IN ARIZION,,,WELL HOW BOUT THIS ,,,LETS ALL BOYCOTT all the mexican restaurents,eaterys,,I MEAN A GOOD STEAK, AN CHICKEN..SEAFOOD ,STILL #1 IN MY BOOK,,CHINNESE DON,T SOUND HALF BAD,,HOW BOUT SOME GOOD GERMAN ,BOEHEMIAN ,GOD ONLY KNOWS THERS A MEXICAN FOOD RESTAURANT ON EVERY STREE CORNER,,I TRAVEL ALL 48 STATES WITH MY JOB,YOU CAN,T IMINAGE ALL THE MEXICAN RESTAURANTS EVERYWHERS,,,WHAT DO YOU THINK ,,BOYCOTT THESE EATERIES AN SEE HOW LONG THEY STAY IN BUSSINESS,,,WHATS GOOD FOR ONE IS GOOD FOR THE OTHER..

    May 25, 2010 at 7:48 a.m.
  • Writein and moneyman,

    I'm neither naive nor indifferent. I'm practical. Something has to be done to stem the flow of illegals into this Country. We are all racially, and socially, profiled in one way or another.
    It's just one of those unfortunate facts of life that when the majority of people breaking this particular law are from a certain ethnicity, then those people will be looked at a little closer if they "break the law". They will be asked to prove they are here legally. I see nothing wrong with that, no more than I would think it was wrong for the cops to stop a certain "type" of car that was involved in a crime and ask the occupants for their ID and ask them other pertinent questions.
    I still feel that this law was passed to deter immigrants from entering through the Arizona border and to make some of them move to other areas of the Country. The real illegal immigrants won't stick around long enough to be caught.
    In time, every state will have to adopt the same laws or their states will be swamped too.

    May 25, 2010 at 7:32 a.m.
  • Born2beme.

    You need to put on the shoes of the next person. It seems to me that you are navie or indifferent to certain facts.

    May 25, 2010 at 6:10 a.m.
  • Being 8th Generation Hispanic has everything to do with it. How much do you want to bet that if Texas passes a law close to what Arizona has passed that I will not be profiled they will not look at me as a American just some brown skin person that fits the profile. Yea his statement has a lot to do with how people feel in this city.

    May 25, 2010 at 5:27 a.m.
  • moneyman,

    apparently Mr. Austin is not talking to, or about, you. If you are an 8th generation American, then you are not illegal. You being Hispanic has nothing to do with it.

    May 24, 2010 at 10:35 p.m.
  • Mr. Austin says "They protest here but how come they don't protest in their own country." Mr. Austin this is my country, I am a 8th generation Texan Hispanic. My family tree goes back to the 1700's we fought during the Texas revolution we fought during the civil war we fought in every major conflict and war after that and you have the nerve to tell us to go back to our country. From what I have read from people in this so called liberal city most share your frame of mind. Do not forget this bill goes for every nationality be it white, black, Asian, not just hispanic. This is my country the Red White and Blue I will be an American the rest of my life.

    May 24, 2010 at 10:13 p.m.
  • gyroscope
    look up definitions on google!

    May 24, 2010 at 2:27 p.m.
  • mike
    30% that's getting up there! I was in one grocery store in Mesa Az one year and I thought I was in Mexico! you also have the American Indians there and they look hispanic!

    May 24, 2010 at 1:41 p.m.
  • The fact of the matter is that the Arizona law is actually more restrictive on law enforcement officers than on federal law enforcement. In the federal law, a person can be asked for their driver's license or proof of citizenship at any time, regardless of whether or not they have committed a routine violation. This statute was deemed constitutional based on a unanimous decision by the Supreme Court in 2005. This already sets a precedence for the new Arizona Law, so it looks like the ACLU, as usual, doesn't have a leg to stand on. I'm not surprised though. The ACLU has a penchant for being on the wrong side of an issue.

    May 24, 2010 at 1:31 p.m.
  • Only 30% of Arizona is Hispanic.

    http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/stat...

    May 24, 2010 at 11:57 a.m.
  • just about everyone in Arizona is hispanic so what's the problem with racial profiling?

    May 24, 2010 at 11:48 a.m.
  • Read the bill. Read the bill. READ THE BILL. You have a computer. Google it and READ it. I guess it is too easy for people to let the vermon like the ALCU pollute their mind. I am totally amazed at the number of people that says it would lead to racial profiling and have no idea what is in the bill.
    One last comment. It shows that Mr. Medina is the Texas ACLU media coordinator. Does he coordinate what the media says about the ACLU?

    May 24, 2010 at 11:25 a.m.
  • "If you are driving down the street, and see a lady in skin tight
    very revealing clothing, pacing back and forth near the curb, with perhaps heavy makeup, what would you first impression be????? hmmmm"

    "She's a dude, dude!"?

    May 24, 2010 at 11:18 a.m.
  • This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.

    May 24, 2010 at 7:59 a.m.
  • People are taking this racial profiling too far. If a Arizona cop stops a family for going five miles over the speed limit, he will not load them all up and take them to the county jail to process them. Can you imagine the paper work and forms he would have to fill out? By the same token, if he nabs a drunken driver or a person who has commited a legitimate crime, that will give him the incentive to get this person off the street and out of the country.

    May 24, 2010 at 7:14 a.m.
  • I'm surpised that the ACLU, with all its legal background, would try to enforce prior restraint on the Arizona lawmakers. The logical way to go about overturning the law on the grounds of racial profiling would be to present strong test cases where the profiling had allegedly already happened. In my opinion, the ACLU will be unable to meet the burden of proof until after it can deliver factual evidence, not speculation, that the law led to profiling. Even then, the courts may find that in balancing the risks of future profiling of individuals with the risks to the general public's safety, including that of illegal aliens, it were better that the law stand.

    May 24, 2010 at 6:51 a.m.
  • Well said historymajor. The polls support Arizona push to secure it's borders and protect it's citizens.

    May 24, 2010 at 2:22 a.m.
  • The racial profiling argument has been used quite a bit in protest of the law in Arizona and the one Texas is considering. Abuse of such laws will occur no matter how clearly worded the law is. That's just how things work. In the border states, the majority of illegal immigrants are from Mexico and Central America. We need reform. The federal government has been lax, at best, in securing the southern border. If people from Mexico and Central America want to come to the US, I say great. Just do it legally and commit to becoming a citizen.

    May 24, 2010 at 1:26 a.m.