County to replace courthouse clock controller

The working clock is an electronic device installed in 1999 when the Victoria County Courthouse was restored. Commissioners voted Monday to replace the clock's controller, which is so old, it won't automatically change for daylight savings time.
  • IN OTHER ACTION:The commissioners court also canvassed the vote from the Nov. 2 general election.

    Elections Administrator George Matthews said about 38 percent of the qualified voters cast ballots, which is about average for a gubernatorial election.

Time may be free, but the cost of repairing the clock that tracks it isn't.

The Victoria County Commissioners Court voted Monday to spend nearly $4,800 to replace the controller for the clocks atop the 1892 courthouse.

"It is obsolete as far as parts are concerned," said Dale Lesikar, the county's maintenance supervisor. "If I was to have a problem with it right now breaking down, it would just be sitting idle until we got a replacement."

While the original bell remains in place, the working clock is an electronic device installed in 1999 when the courthouse was restored and uses a circuit board controller.

The controller is so old that it doesn't automatically change for the switch to and from daylight-saving time and it won't accept manual changes, Lesikar said.

"If it's 12 o'clock, the bell will not strike until about two minutes after," he said. "I cannot get that corrected."

Information from the manufacturer, The Verdin Co. of Ohio, states the new digital bell and controller will automatically adjust the time each fall and spring. It also has a battery backup in case of power failure.

It has such added features as funeral toll and strikes on the half hour.