Creation Museum, same-sex couple dispute entrance

PETERSBURG, Ky. (AP) - A museum based on a literal interpretation of the Bible denied a same-sex couple admittance for a Date Night event.

Both officials from the Creation Museum in Petersburg and the couple denied admission agree that they weren't let in for the event and not reimbursed the $71.90 cost for the two tickets they had purchased online.

But, the two sides are at odds over whether it was clear before the event took place that same-sex couples would be turned away.

Jonathan Meador of Louisville, who was involved in the dispute, told The Kentucky Enquirer that the museum's website made no mention of denying same-sex couples when promoting Date Night.

Mark Looy, chief communications officer for the Creation Museum, which shows visitors how the world was created in six, 24-hour days, 6,000 to 10,000 years ago, said the promotional material made it clear the event was for heterosexual couples only.

The event included dinner, a talk from museum founder Ken Ham about love and the Biblical view of marriage and musical performances.

"The message was one of Christian marriage, which the Bible teaches is between a man and a woman," Looy said.

The dispute started when Meador, a female guest and a third man, Joe Sonka of Lexington, approached security. Sonka told security he was waiting for a friend.

Meador said Sonka told security personnel his friend was a man, prompting museum officials to deny him admission. Meador and his date were allowed in. Meador said to his knowledge, no one in the group is homosexual.

Meador said Sonka had posted a blog entry in January suggesting that it was the patriotic duty of his readers to send a flamboyantly gay couple to the event.

Looy said the blog post hints that the group was looking to provoke an incident.

"We are not going to allow anyone to come to a private event and be disruptive," Looy said. "It's not fair to the other people who also paid to attend the event. We welcome anyone to come to the Creation Museum during regular business hours because we want all people to be exposed to our message."

Meador said museum officials didn't break any laws, but feels they should have at least refunded the cost of admission.

"It is telling, however, that they equate gayness and flamboyance with disruption," Meador said.

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Information from: The Kentucky Enquirer, http://www.nky.com