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Former journalists will speak about local storms, concept of weather

By FROM NEWS RELEASE
Jan. 17, 2011 at 6:01 p.m.
Updated Jan. 16, 2011 at 7:17 p.m.

Henry Wolff Jr.

IF YOU GO WHAT: University of Houston - Victoria's Community of Readers forum.

WHO: Former journalists Henry Wolff Jr. and his wife, Linda Wolff, will review the hurricane history of the Texas Coastal Bend as part of the

WHEN: Noon - 1 p.m., Thursday

WHERE: UHV Multi-Purpose room, 3007 N. Ben Wilson St.

COST: This event is free and open to the public

For more information, visit uhv.edu/communityofreaders or e-mail readers@uhv.edu.

Long-time journalists Henry Wolff Jr. and his wife, Linda Wolff, will share stories of Costal Bend storms and devastation at a special lecture Thursday.

The couple, who chronicled the Coastal Bend area during their newspaper careers, will talk about hurricanes that destroyed the coastal town of Indianola and other weather disasters.

The two will speak at the University of Houston-Victoria as part of its Community of Readers forum.

Henry Wolff Jr. is a long-time Texas journalist whose career spanned half a century. Before retiring from the Advocate, his column, "Henry's Journal," appeared for three decades. He penned more than 6,000 columns about residents of the Texas coastal plains.

His talk will also detail his own ideas about weather.

"Since I am from West Texas, I'll also discuss how moving to the coast after the drought-stricken 1950s and experiencing the storms here have affected my concept of weather," he said.

Linda Wolff is a former staff writer and bureau reporter for the Advocate in Port Lavaca. In 1993, she left the newspaper and became a consultant to the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department, where she supported nature tourism efforts. She is author of "Indianola and Matagorda Island, 1837 to 1887," a local history guide to the historic seaport.

Henry Wolff said his wife will discuss two major Indianola storms that nearly destroyed what was once a thriving entry point on Matagorda Bay in Calhoun County.

"Indianola rivaled Galveston as a port, where much of the 19th century immigration and supplies for the western forts came through," he said. "It was virtually wiped off the map again by Hurricane Carla in 1961."

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