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Area law enforcement agencies say security is a top concern

By Gheni_Platenburg
Jan. 24, 2011 at 7:03 p.m.
Updated Jan. 23, 2011 at 7:24 p.m.


In the wake of Sunday's police precinct shootings in Detroit, area law enforcement agencies expressed the need for thorough security measures to protect both officers and patrons.

"The Detroit shooting incident continues to drive home the point that law enforcement is a very dangerous profession, no matter if it is on a traffic stop or at the local police station. Many public facilities, including police stations, schools and college campuses, have experienced shooting tragedies where lives have been tragically lost. It is our job in law enforcement to learn from each incident and work hard at reducing the chances of it reoccurring again in the future," said Victoria Police Chief Bruce Ure. "To classify the task as daunting is quite an understatement."

Controlled access points and bullet proof glass are among the security measures used at both the Victoria County and DeWitt County Sheriff's Offices.

"We're all packing and then some," said Victoria County Sheriff T. Michael O'Connor. "We won't be caught off guard."

Both Yoakum Police Chief Arthur Rogers and Ure said their precincts were well-guarded, but they declined to provide further details.

"For obvious reasons, we do not comment on our facility security measures; however, it is important to note that we do take our facility security here very seriously," Ure said. "We work very hard at balancing a welcoming public access perception with a safe work environment for our officers and staff."

Meanwhile, smaller agencies like the Cuero Police Department said a lack of financial resources prevent them from making many security installments.

"We're a small agency and those types of measures can be pretty expensive," said Cuero Police Chief Jay Lewis.

All agreed that maintaining a high level of security is a continuous effort.

"We work on it on a frequent basis, but you can never practice too much," O'Connor said.

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