Comments

  • "The hope is they'll come for the softball tournament but then come back and visit for extended stay," he said.

    Isn't this about a little league tournament? Little league, if I'm not mistaken, is baseball not softball. If you are going to be part of an article, at least sound like you know what is happening. This should be about the kids not the money.

    July 8, 2011 at 9:15 p.m.
  • HookEm1, I totally agree. When when what's good for the community is measured by whether or not it makes a positive financial impact, our culture is going down the drain. When community events are based n their ability to make money they will be much more prone to fail than if they are based on having FUN. When people have a good time the extra income will be a welcome byproduct.

    July 8, 2011 at 11:36 a.m.
  • This comment was removed by the site staff for violation of the usage agreement.

    July 8, 2011 at 8:28 a.m.
  • Thanks Edith, yes I did miss it.

    Vicad, I apologize for the sarcasm.

    A million might be a stretch but it was good for Victoria.

    July 8, 2011 at 7:24 a.m.
  • Jasonbourne—you must have missed this story on last year’s Hooters’ Tournament: http://www.victoriaadvocate.com/news/... . The title on it is “Golf tournament will infuse about $1 million into Victoria economy, experts estimate”. In this article, Randy Vivian is quoted, “It took about $70,000 to put the tournament together, but the event will infuse about $1 million back into the community…That's bang for your buck right there.”

    Apparently it was the Hooters’ Tour’s turn last year. This year it is Little League’s turn, and that’s a good thing.

    Back to the Hooters’ Golf Tournament—I wish the Advocate had followed up on Vivian’s prediction. I’m still wondering if our sales tax revenue for that quarter reflects that million in sales or not.

    Hookem1—for the Advocate to constantly remind us that all things that exchange money for goods or services is economic development is insulting don’t you think? Or that it only counts if it is of a large scale. But yeah, the obligatory quote from Vivian or Dale Fowler is getting old. Vivian’s track record could be better in attracting retail. Fowler scores once a decade.

    I could not possibly agree with you more.

    July 8, 2011 at 6:55 a.m.
  • Victoria Country Club recently hosted a fantastic 4 DAY professional golf tournament. Lot's of Hooters personnel, lot's of golfers, golfers families, caddies, and visitors came to town for this.

    Apparently there is no benefit for Victoria from this event. I'm not sure how they did it but none of these folks bought food, gas, spent the night, or did anything while in town for 4 DAYS. Strange!!!

    Actually most of these folks were here for 6 days.

    July 8, 2011 at 6:06 a.m.
  • Come on, Victoria Advocate! It is a bunch of baseball games. It is suppose to be a fun events for kids and parents.

    Why, does the Advocate feel compelled to turn everything that happens in this town into an economic development issue?

    What comes next? Do you stop all visitors at the city limits and fit them with a UPC bar code, so you can keep count of how much they spend and then figure the 1 1/2% tax they are paying?

    Does every single event you cover require a quote from Randy Vivian or Dale Fowler explaining how we are all just a small cog in the all important Victoria economic development plan?

    You report ... "Events like the tournament are good for the community because they contribute to the sales tax base", said Randy Vivian.
    Well, I say that is bull! Baseball games were good waaay before there was ever such a thing as a "sales tax base"!

    For crying-out-loud, this reader does NOT believe that our sole reason for existence is "to contribute to the sales tax base". What does it say for a community, when you come to the point that you can not even let a bunch of kids play baseball ... without figuring out how much tax revenue is generated?

    It is a sad commentary, if this newspaper really reflects the majority of thinking in Victoria.

    July 8, 2011 at 4:13 a.m.