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Van Gogh, other impressionists work on exhibit at Houston museum

By by dianna wray/dwray@vicad.com
March 16, 2011 at 3:02 p.m.
Updated March 15, 2011 at 10:16 p.m.

"Young Woman with Peonies," 1870, by Frédéric Bazille. The work is oil on canvas and is part of the Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon collection at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

IF YOU GO

What: The National Gallery of Art's Impressionist and Post-Impressionist Show at Houston's Museum of Fine Arts.

When: Through May 23

Hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday; 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 12:15 p.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday; closed Monday.

Admission: $20 for adults ($15 on Thursdays), $15 for children and seniors ($10 on Thursdays).

Where: Houston's Museum of Fine Arts, 1001 Bissonet St., Houston, Texas, 77005.

If you wanna see some real pretty pictures, get yourself hence to the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston.

The National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., has sent its collection of impressionist and post-impressionist works on the road. The work includes Van Gogh, Monet, Manet, Renoir and Toulouse Lautrec.

The National Gallery has one of the best collections of this period available and if you've never seen Van Gogh's work up close and personal, this is a chance not to be missed. He was pretty crazy by this point in his life - he created most of the paintings in this collection while he was in an asylum in France.

It's cliche, because every artsy-type person ever to wander through the world has gone through a Van Gogh phase. His paintings, like the works of so many painters from this era, reflect the world both as he saw and felt it.

The Dutch post-impressionist only sold one painting in his entire life. He spent a lot of time being crazy, once going so far as to cut off his ear. (He gave it to a prostitute, instructing her to "hold this" for him, legend has it.)

He tried to commit suicide, botched it up and then finally died of his wounds in 1890.

He may never have realized how great he was, but the power of it all shows up in his canvas. It's a sight to be seen, so grab hold of this chance and go see it.

But anyways, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. usually keeps its goodies to itself, but the section these guys are usually housed in is undergoing renovation, so Houston wins, and so do you.

Unless you've been to the gallery itself, you haven't had a chance to see most of these works, and seeing their work is well worth the price of the ticket. So get on out and go see this show.

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