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Chisholm Trail Heritage Museum names first director

By Sonny Long
Oct. 11, 2011 at 5:11 a.m.

Beverly Hadley

MEET BEVERLY HADLEY

POSITION: Executive director Chisholm Trail Heritage Museum, Cuero

AGE: 59

HOMETOWN: Kemah

EDUCATION: Mississippi State College for Women (speech communications); University of Alabama (audiology)

TIDBITS: Hadley played basketball at Mississippi State College for Women.

MEETING SPACE

The Chisholm Trail Heritage Museum multi-purpose community rooms are available for private functions and meetings. Call 361-277-2866 for rates and other information.

CUERO - Beverly Hadley likes the friendliness of the people of Cuero.

"People are just walking up to me, introducing themselves and saying, 'You're the new museum director aren't you?' It's delightful," she said.

Hadley is the new executive director of the Chisholm Trail Heritage Museum, 302 N. Esplanade St.

"We are delighted to have Beverly as our first executive director of the museum and multi-purpose community facility - she will make the perfect addition to the team of board members that is working to make the project a success," said museum board chairman Robert Oliver. "She will be responsible for all aspects of the day-to-day functions of the project."

Ranging reporter Sonny Long spent some time with Hadley in her office inside the museum, housed in the Knights of Pythias Hall which is on the National Register of Historic Places.

What attracted you to this position?

What impressed me the most is what the board has done to make this museum a reality to honor the heritage, to honor the Trail. They have worked hard to make that dream come true. And I love ranching history.

You were previously at a museum in Uvalde?

Yes, I was at the the John Nance Garner Museum for about six years. While there, I researched and helped to produce several exhibits including a ranching exhibit titled, "Two Hundred Years of Ranching in Texas."

You worked in another field before that, right?

Yes. For probably 15 years or so. I worked with ear, nose and throat doctors specializing in motion sickness. I also worked for NASA doing motion sickness research.

How did you become interested in museum work?

I have always loved museums. My parents took me often as a child. I was retired and raising goats when the position opened in Uvalde. I thought it would be something I would enjoy getting into.

What do you see as the biggest challenge at the Chisholm Trail Heritage Museum?

At this or any other museum, the biggest challenge is fundraising. The board and this community have done a great job so far, and we still have work to do. While our next fundraising goal is an ambitious $1.8 million, it will allow the Chisholm Trail Heritage Museum to become a regional museum with national prominence and put Cuero on the map as a destination for heritage tourists.

What do you most want people to know about the Chisholm Trail Heritage Museum?

What I hope people understand is that this is truly a first class operation. We have some of the best exhibit designers in the country on board. It's going to wow people. An example of this is the Horsemen of Americas - Tinker Collection. This community is so fortunate to have this rare and priceless collection of ranching and horse-related artifacts.

What is the anticipated opening date of the museum.

If the fundraising effort goes according to plan then we would anticipate opening the museum in the summer of 2013.

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