Comments

  • At least give the Sheriff a copy of DSM-IV-TR.

    March 23, 2012 at 10:37 a.m.
  • So why is he still sitting in jail. (guilty or not) this town does give bail. now be sure to lie to grand jury (u can get off with slap on hand); or find a good lawyer u can walk free (guilty or not). My grandkid second grade had a child improperly touch him and they complained to the school and all was sweep under the rug. kid even told grandkid that he doesnt cry when it is done to him. oopssssssssss SO WHY IS HE STILL IN JAIL all other offenders (guilty or not ) walk free till court date then the final decision.

    March 23, 2012 at 9:27 a.m.
  • Observer.
    Can you tell me, no everybody, why Texas is almost last in mental health?

    October 17, 2011 at 7:18 p.m.
  • This CHILD has had more than his fair share of unfair!

    October 17, 2011 at 1:32 p.m.
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    October 17, 2011 at 12:56 p.m.
  • This family and the young man really need our prayers. This is such a horrible mess for all of the families and Jeremy as well. May God bless them all.

    October 17, 2011 at 11:25 a.m.
  • People charged with serious crimes are held in jail and prison all the time, not just those that are mentally handicapped.

    Why no outrage at this?

    When these people are found guilty they usually get credit for time already served while awaiting trial.

    If not guilty or innocent there is nothing for them.

    October 17, 2011 at 9:37 a.m.
  • @ Tiredofignorance - Jeremy did attend public school and graduated as well. He even participated and from the sounds of it did well in a tennis program with Mr. Dunn (not sure the name of it). Jeremy was a neighbor for many years when he was in elemetary school. He attended DeLeon and Crain.

    October 17, 2011 at 8:34 a.m.
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    October 16, 2011 at 10:13 p.m.
  • This story is definitely missing some information. This time last year a 17 yo "child" was about to turn 18 and be discharged from his living facility. Plans should have been made a LONG time before he turned 18. Certianly the family knew this? What waiting list were they currently on? Was he on Gulf Bend Center housing lists? Altantis Foundation serves adults, Devereux? Certainly none of these places can take a person the day a call is made. Was this young man enrolled in public school? They could have provided a residential placement if they felt that they were unable to educate him.

    Just seems like there is part of the story missing. (I'm guessing kid was discharged and life wasn't too bad. Now he's accused of something bad and he's falling through the cracks.)

    And, even though I have questions about why this situation had to come to this point, I do not agree with detaining a severely mentally ill and cognitively disabled person in jail.

    October 16, 2011 at 9:27 p.m.
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    October 16, 2011 at 4:59 p.m.
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    October 16, 2011 at 4:50 p.m.
  • Here we go again. Once again, the liberals have proved that they do not have the intelligence to understand the Law of Unintended Consequences. The Community Mental Health Act of 1963, part of JFK's New Frontier legislation, was enacted with the best of intentions.

    The mental hospital systems operated by most States at the time did have problems. Rather than address the existing problems in systems that were keeping the mentally ill and mentally retarded off the streets and out of jails, the liberals threw the baby out with the bath water. This legislation was implemented with a vengance, resulting in the mass closing of hundreds and hundreds of State mental hospitals and mental retardation facilities. Just like the subject of this article, the residents were dumped on the streets to fend for themselves as best they could.

    And the Community Mental Health Centers that were to be opened across the country to accommodate these individuals? They never opened and it was NOT for lack of funding. Rather, it was due to a very predictable phenomenon known as NIMBY. There was overwhelming resistance in almost every neighborhood where a facility was proposed.

    So, with the best of intentions, the liberals destroyed a functioning inpatient mental health system in the States and replaced it with NOTHING. We will continue to pay for this idiocy through increased taxes to house the mentally ill in jails and prisons until enough people wake up and begin to demand the reinstatement of the systems of state-run hospitals for the mentally ill and mentally retarded.

    October 16, 2011 at 2:20 p.m.
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    October 16, 2011 at 1:58 p.m.
  • Rebecca
    A mentally ill person with a very low IQ has been in jail for five months without a trial! That doesn't bother anyone?

    Nope, just listen to today’s political rhetoric over this nation’s responsibility of caring for these unfortunates and helping the loving couple who took him in. The act of caring for our own is now considered a Socialistic Doctrine of the Democratic Party.
    Not much difference in the Nazi Third Reich’s position of caring for this child and the extreme right wing’s position on mental health care, among other things.

    Just listen to cheers and jeers of the Tea Party Debates.

    October 16, 2011 at 1:51 p.m.
  • Thanks for taking the time to let me explain and for giving me the benefit of the doubt, Sug and neighbor. I agree that he shouldn't be on the streets, I'm just not seeing how jails should take the place of mental institutions or homes.

    I don't think it's appropriate to attack the family.

    D=

    October 16, 2011 at 1:51 p.m.
  • Rebecca - now there's something we can both agree on:

    "I wish there was not a "huge hole in the mental health care system."

    Thanks for the civil dialogue.

    October 16, 2011 at 1:44 p.m.
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    October 16, 2011 at 1:40 p.m.
  • Jeremy had (about) a fifty percent chance of being incarcerated before he was even born, because of a choice his biological mother made.

    Jeremy was the same on his 18th birthday as he was the day before he turned eighteen. I guess I'm saying "what's a few months?"

    If we are worried about the safety of other children in these homes, then we would be separating them at a much younger age. We would not be waiting until they were eighteen. I'm hoping we do that already, because my son was taller than me before he was 15...

    My son is about Jeremy's age. We have known Jeremy all of his life. Jeremy my be eighteen, chronologically, but it's very obvious that mentally, he is a child.

    I wish there was not a "huge hole in the mental health care system."

    October 16, 2011 at 1:34 p.m.
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    October 16, 2011 at 1:19 p.m.
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    October 16, 2011 at 1:05 p.m.
  • Rebecca - since "He faces four counts of indecency with a child by contact, a second-degree felony" would you risk placing him among a general population? Would you take that chance? What if one of your children was among those at the group home?

    I know from personal experience that such charges are very serious and are not usually handed down lightly, particularly when dealing with a young man who does not have the capacity to understand the legality of those charges.

    October 16, 2011 at 12:31 p.m.
  • I wish Jeremy could have gone to a similar home, like the one he was in, where he could be off of the streets, instead of "graduated" to a county jail.

    I think he should have been in that home until the wait for the other one was up.

    October 16, 2011 at 10:51 a.m.
  • Rebecca, my comment wasn't aimed at you, or anyone in particular.

    This article truly gives one a lot to think about, and there are no easy answers. I do agree that we need better facilities for people who do not do well in a setting like this.

    Jail is not meant to be a setting for enrichment. Where would you suggest that right here, right now, he be held otherwise? Would you have him go back to his family? Remember, he doesn't have to stay there, or anywhere. He could flee just as easily as anyone else. Would you have him stay in a group home? What if, as I've said, he is unable to mix with the general population in a group home? Then, would you place him in solitary in a group home? How is that different than placing him in a jail cell?

    What would be the answer here?

    I really have none, because I think there isn't a good one. This is not a perfect world. If it were, we would have a "perfect" place for people like this. Until we do, I think this is the best solution at this time for this individual. He is safe. Society is safe. He will have his trial in due time. He in jail right now because, according to attorney Filley, "Our society attempts not to imprison the mentally ill, but when they are found incompetent, the state hospital doesn't have enough room". Assuming this is true, Rebecca, and knowing he cannot go to a state hospital, where would you rather this young man be right now?

    October 16, 2011 at 10:32 a.m.
  • A mentally ill person with a very low IQ has been in jail for five months without a trial! That doesn't bother anyone?

    October 16, 2011 at 10:22 a.m.
  • Could you dig a little deeper by reading my comment in the context of the article? =P

    I wasn't implying anything in my comment except that Jeremy's cognitive ability is comparable to that of a small child.

    But, think about it, if you believe that people are "innocent until proven guilty" then putting someone with an IQ of a small child in jail for several months, before they are tried, before they are shown to be not competent to stand trial, should not feel like the best thing to do.

    We need better facilities for people like Jeremy. He shouldn't have been kicked out when he turned eighteen. Jails shouldn't be holding-pens for the mentally disabled.

    October 16, 2011 at 10:15 a.m.
  • This "child" has been diagnosed with, among other mental illnesses, "intermittent explosive disorder". This makes this man a time bomb that can off at any time. Digalitldper is right. He has the biological hormonal makeup of a man now, not a child, and the body of a man, even though he may have the IQ of a child. This man is at least safer in prison than he would be on the streets. He is, after all, eighteen now. He can decide he wants to live on the streets or in a forest. And there is nothing to stop him from doing so. The place he is in now is safer for him, and safer for society.

    A group home may not be the most appropriate answer, either. There are certain individuals who cannot mingle with others safely no matter the surroundings.

    I realize this is a heartbreaking situation for this young man's family. There will be no winners in the end, I suspect. But right now, I believe that people should be held accountable for their actions, WITH MITIGATING CIRCUMSTANCES CONSIDERED, and appropriate action taken. This man will likely become a ward of the state in one way or another, be it as an inmate in a correctional system or in a state home.

    October 16, 2011 at 10:14 a.m.
  • In Texas, we'd we would execute him if the Supreme Court hadn't put a stop our pesky habit of bumping off these unfortunates.  And at the next Tea Party debate, The audience would cheer at Perry’s mention of “the ultimate justice" in Texas.

    October 16, 2011 at 8:22 a.m.
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    October 16, 2011 at 7:47 a.m.
  • This is like putting a small child in jail.

    October 16, 2011 at 7:43 a.m.
  • This is breaking my heart. I feel for you Mrs. Weaver, hang in there and keep fighting for your son.
    Victoria needs to open up a home, and a safe place for children and adults like your son, for help. It's just not right to place them with others that do not understand mental illness. I will keep you, your son, and family in my prayers.

    October 16, 2011 at 7:33 a.m.
  • We must act quickly !!! Deregulate something fast ! Lets let psychiatrist need only a GED to practice medicine. That way we can get them to work for minimum wage. Then give yet another tax cut to the richest Americans like we have been doing for the last 10 years. That is why we are rolling in it-because it works so well. Problem solved by means of deregulation and tax cuts to the wealthy. Dang were good.

    October 16, 2011 at 2:06 a.m.