Saturday, November 22, 2014




Advertise with us

Victoria screenwriter receives national recognition

By Camille Doty
Oct. 28, 2011 at 5:28 a.m.
Updated Oct. 29, 2011 at 5:29 a.m.


GET TO KNOW:

NAME: Aaron Marshall

BIRTHDAY: Aug. 12

EDUCATION: Victoria High School, University of Texas-Austin

MOVIE CREDITS: "True Love," 2010; "Zombie Girl: The Movie," 2009; "Santa Ana," 2005; "When the Cat's Away," 2005; "Black-eyed," 2003; "Master of the Game 2002," "12th" and "Ripley," 2000.

WHAT HE MISSES ABOUT VICTORIA: "You can get anywhere you want in 10 minutes. I also miss Sonic and H-E-B."

Aaron Marshall has come a long way from making home movies about garden gnomes wreaking havoc in Victoria. But, the 33-year-old writer has kept his youthful creativity.

He knew at a young age what he wanted to do.

"Once I got my hands on a video camera, I realized this was something for me."

Marshall, a Victoria native, was named a top 10 finalist in the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences 2011 Nicholl Fellowships in Screenwriting for his script, "Fig Hunt: The Quest for Battle Armor Star Captain."

The film's main character, Jason, is a 30-year-old man, suffering from "Peter Pan Syndrome." He and best friend, Marcus, embark on an epic quest to find a four-inch action figure. They are based in Texas, but are willing to travel nationwide to get the desired prize, Battle Armor Star Captain.

Marshall will be honored at the academy's weeklong conference in Beverly Hills, on Thursday. He did not receive one of the fellowships, but made the top 10 from 6,730 entries.

During the weeklong conference, Marshall will attend seminars and talk to movie directors.

Greg Beal, director of the Nicholl Fellowships, said each script was judged multiple times.

Beal said his script was well-liked and informative.

"I had no idea this wacky world exists," he said.

Marshall said action-figure collectors are in a niche market that generates billions of dollars in revenue. Jason has an unhealthy obsession with the miniature statues.

The film's protagonist reaches a crossroads, when he has to decide to pursue the collectors' item or become a responsible adult. He chose the former. Along the way, he has conflict with his rivals and even his best friend.

The University of Texas-Austin alum admitted to liking super heroes, but not to the same degree as his character.

"Rest assured, there are some toys in my closet," he said.

Marshall said he would like the fig hunt movie to be his next movie project and have some connection with his hometown.

"I hope to be able to come back," he said. "I would even like to shoot part of it in Victoria."

SHARE

Comments


Powered By AdvocateDigitalMedia