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GC: The Nest Sounds Studio home to professional recording equipment

By Jessica Rodrigo
Jan. 26, 2012 at 11 a.m.
Updated Jan. 25, 2012 at 7:26 p.m.


THE NEST SOUND STUDIO

Phone: 361-655-6511Websites: myspace.com/blujproductions, facebook.com/nestsoundstudio, reverbnation.com/thenestsoundstudio Music genres: Any - From country to rap to pop and also radio commercials and voiceovers

What's in the Nest (just to name a few)?

MICROPHONES:Pearlman TM-1 with Telefunken Tube

Neumann U87

Shure KSM44 (Stereo Pair)

Beyerdynamic M160 Ribbon

OUTBOARD MIC PREAMPS:Neve Portico 5012 (2 Channels)

Langevin DVC (2 Channels)

A Designs Pacifica (2 Channels)

COMPRESSORS/EFX PROCESSORS:Manley Elop (2 Channels)

Neve Portico 5043 (2 Channels)

Universal Audio 2-1176 (2 Channels)

Empirical Labs Distressor with British Mose (Pair)

MIXING SURFACES:Tascam M-3500 32 Track Analog Console

Digidesign Command 8 Control Surface

Frontier Tranzport Daw Remote Contro

SYNTHS/SAMPLERS/VIRTUAL INSTRUMENTS:Roland SH-101

Korg MS2000R

Yamaha Motif Rack

Atari 2600 with Synthcart (MIDI-Controlled Atari)

Bring the vocals, the lyrics and the instruments and The Nest will supply the rest. Together, Jeremy Bludau and Robbie Cantu have nurtured The Nest Sound Studio from the ground up and turned it into the professional sound studio that it now is.

"I offer the best sound quality," said Bludau. "In order for it to be a professional product, you have to put professional equipment and professional experience in that equation to make it sound right."

Bludau, the owner of The Nest, added that technology has fostered a lot of amateur musicians. Inexpensive recording and mixing software is available online and in stores, so amateur vocalists and bands will produce music that is low-quality. He says The Nest houses some of the same equipment that larger sound studios in Houston are using to produce artists and groups on the up and up.

The Nest uses ProTools, which is a digital audio software program that professionals use to record, cut and master music so that it sounds better anywhere.

"When I get done with a track, I'll play it in my car," said Bludau. "That's where I'll decide what needs to be changed. When it's done, you want it to sound good, in my speakers, in the car, on an AM radio. You want it to sound good anywhere."

MUSIC TO YOUR EARS

The Nest's setup will sound like a theater-grade system to the untrained ear, but making sure it sounds good on a car or grocery store sound system, for example, will take some work. The studio has a control board that spans a few feet wide and is full of knobs and buttons placed in neat rows for tweaking tunes and beats. Next to it stands a tower of compressors and distressors more than five feet high. Along the adjacent wall, embellished with sound absorbers, is another setup with keyboards and even a still-working Atari. Using a MIDI device, the game console is used with a keyboard to produce sounds that can be used in music production.

"I can make a movie soundtrack if I want to," he said. "Everything does something different. This place is outfitted for it." Bludau said the studio is a "full-blown music facility."

In the end, an artist or band may come out with a track that is no more than a few minutes long, but may take more than a day's worth of work before it is "mastered."

"You want it to sound cohesive with other works," he said. "This way when artists have a full CD of songs, you don't want each song to sound like it was recorded on a different day. It's a smooth, polished version."

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