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Urban returns to Victoria for annual football camp

By MIKE FORMAN
June 23, 2012 at 1:23 a.m.
Updated June 24, 2012 at 1:24 a.m.

Jerheme Urban works with high school senior  receivers during his football camp at Victoria West  on Saturday. Urban's day-long workshop was free and attracted many looking for a chance to learn and get better.

Jerheme Urban is uncertain whether his professional football career will continue, but he returned to Victoria on Saturday for his annual free football camp at Victoria West High School.

Urban graduated from Stroman and went to Trinity University before spending nine years as a wide receiver in the NFL with the Seattle Seahawks, Dallas Cowboys, Arizona Cardinals and Kansas City Chiefs.

Urban and his staff of former Trinity players and high school coaches worked with campers on their quarterback and receiving skills.

"They actually give you more inspiration that you can fulfill your dreams," said West senior Xavier Ramos. "A little town like Victoria, Texas, and you actually have a chance to go into the NFL and live your dream."

After spending a good portion of the day in the heat, Urban answered five questions about his camp.

What is you assessment after holding the camp for five years?

I think from a coaches' production side that it's continued to progress amazingly. We have so many of the guys who are here that were teasing me they needed their fifth-year pin. When you have that kind of stability from the coaching staff and the fact they know their drills and they know how to operate through this thing, it only helps make it run more smoothly and I think the kids benefit from that.

What are the challenges of working with players at different skill levels

The important thing is for me to find a staff that can come out here and coach to all those skill levels. The guys that I have here are truly unique and I think you see that with a lot of high school coaches. They understand some kids are more athletic, but at the same time they find the good things that the kids do and they build them up on that. At the same time they are coaching. Everybody, even myself, Larry Fitzgerald needs to be coached and critiqued. We're trying to teach fundamentals, but build on what they do well.

How much of what you teach carries over to the field?

I think the stuff they learned today, they can take 100 percent and apply it to the season. I don't think that anything we did today is something that is not football productive or football beneficial. We harp on proper fundamentals, proper technique and when you do that it definitely pays off on the field.

Why do you think it is important to talk to the campers about life skills?

The reality is no matter if it's junior high, high school, college or if you get a chance to continue in the NFL, football is only a certain season of your life. The reality is, Lord willing, most of these kids will grow up and be fathers, be husbands and hopefully productive citizens. The reality is football is just a stepping stone in there. We harp on being men of integrity, having good values, making sure that you're accountable to your teammates, making sure you're accountable to your coaches. If you're doing that and you're living a life of integrity, the other things are going to fall in place for you. You're going to be productive at work, you're going to have a good family and those are the things we need out there.

What do you see for the future of the camp?

I've had some of the coaches who have been in my ear a little bit about dividing it up into two camps and having skill guys in the mornings and big guys in the afternoons or vice versa. I think there's a need for that based on parents emailing in asking 'Hey, when are you going to do something for my lineman?' That's something we're moving toward. Obviously we're definitely planning on being back in Victoria doing this camp for a long time.

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