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Kyle Park longing for love at Schroeder Hall

By by melissa crowe/mcrowe@vicad.com
Nov. 14, 2012 at 5:14 a.m.


You can bet on it

Wednesday, Nov. 21 at Schroeder Dance Hall, 12516 Farm-to-Market Road 622,

Goliad. $15. 361-573-7002. schroederdancehall.com

Texas is ripe with country stars, but making it to that stage isn't easy.

Kyle Park, a 27-year-old Austin singer/songwriter, took a break from recording his new album to discuss musical musings, lost love and how it all comes together to make his style of country.



WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS ON LOVE?

By all means, not every love song I write is about a relationship I've been in. Sometimes, it's about situations with friends of mine. It's like writing a book - I think if I were this character, how would I feel. It's not like I got burned and I'm telling the world about it. There are certainly songs that way, but not all of them.

I could be writing about floating the river, drinking beer or riding horses. I just feel like love never gets old. Everyone's interested in love: cowboys, gangsters and businessmen.

SO WHAT'S YOUR FAVORITE?

My favorite love song is on the new album, "Like Nobody Will." The lyric I love is: "I may be a nobody, but I'll love you like nobody will."

HOW IS THE NEW ALBUM COMING?

I finally have a name for it, which is good since I've been writing it for six months. It's called "Begging for More." ...The last thing she wants is that boy to be a dog, but there's that one case where she wants him to beg.

The album has 13 songs. There's one song I wrote at least five years ago that I finally recorded, and one I still haven't finished yet. I'll probably finish it today. It's called "True Love." It's a real life event, that's why I'm taking so long finishing it. Once it's recorded, it's out there forever.

I can't tell you all my secrets, but the first line goes, "I never saw true love coming. How could I?"

YOU STARTED PLAYING BARS BEFORE YOU COULD DRIVE?

It wasn't like I was in the bars when I was 15. When I was a kid, I played once or twice a month. I had to quit baseball in high school because I had too many shows and the games were always Friday nights. I said, 'Coach, I can't make the games because I have a gig.' I knew I wasn't going to be a professional baseball player. I think I made the right choice.

HOW DOES THE OUTCOME OF THE ELECTION AFFECT YOU?

I really haven't given it much thought. I've always been told that when times are good, it's good to be in the bar business. When times are bad, it's good to be in the bar business.

WHAT'S YOUR MUSICAL OR STYLISTIC BACKGROUND?

I never wrote a song with the intention of someone else singing it. When I was a kid, a good friend of mine could play anything like Stevie Ray Vaughan, note-for-note. But someone said we already had a Stevie Ray Vaughan. That hit me. I was 16 at the time, so I've always tried to be myself.

I don't know how much I sound like them, the way I sing or enunciate. My favorites are George Strait, Clint Black, Merle Haggard, Lyle Lovett. But I don't think I sound like those guys. You're supposed to sound like yourself.

YOU'RE NO STRANGER TO SCHROEDER HALL?

I've been playing at Schroeder Hall for probably four years now. I just love the owners of the club.

We've played some cool stages and we've been to some cool places. It's always an honor and pleasure to be there. There's always a great, young crowd up in front of the stage partying with us.

The most fun I have in life is the hour and a half I have on stage singing and performing ... touching people's lives with the words I write.

WHAT'S YOUR NEXT STEP?

I want to be able to play as far away as I can from my home city. That's the level of being a better artist - you can travel away from home and have great crowds. Right now we play everywhere in Texas, we've played the Midwest, the East Coast, we've played in Alaska and Europe. You just have to imagine the little snowball going down the hill.

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