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Film starring 'Blade Runner' actor plays to packed theater

By JR Ortega
April 5, 2013 at 9:03 p.m.
Updated April 4, 2013 at 11:05 p.m.

Rutger Hauer, known best for his leading role in "Blade Runner," takes questions during a question-and-answer session at the Leo J. Welder Center. Hauer's latest film, "Il Futuro," played Friday night.

What can you catch Saturday at the Leo J. Welder Center?

• Noon

"Return to Honor"

• 2 p.m.

"An Unreal Dream"

• 4 p.m.

"Arcadia"("Jody's Bra" - short)

• 6 p.m.

"Satellite of Love" ("The Lift" - short)

• 8 p.m.

"The Dirties" ("American 101" - short)

• 10 p.m.

Creepy shorts ("Quiver," "Augenblicke," "Caterwaul"

"Kim Jest Avrid Pekon," "Cold Turkey," "Grasshopper")

*For more scheduling, see the Victoria Advocate's coverage.

The name Rutger Hauer reeled in Crossroads residents such as Ida Gaona, who was excited to see Hollywood come to Victoria.

"When I heard 'Blade Runner' I was like, 'I know that one,'" said the longtime WoodHi resident at the Leo J. Welder Center as she waited for the 6 p.m. Friday showing of "Il Futuro," a film starring Hauer.

This was Gaona's first time to attend the Victoria TX Independent Film Festival, which is in its second year and added music and art into this year's program.

The film revolves around Hauer's character, Maciste, a blind man who is at first being used by a young girl, Bianca, whose parents die in a wreck.

Bianca, played by Manuela Martelli, resorts to living with her brother, who invites two friends to stay at their home. The four devise a plan to steal from Maciste by using Bianca as bait.

Instead, Bianca, ends up falling in love with Maciste, and finds normalcy and acceptance with Hauer's character.

It's a story that is familiar to Christine Elise McCarthy, who loves it.

"This was another opportunity to see it," said McCarthy, who helps program the film festival. She is also a juror. "I hadn't seen it on the big screen. Plus, Rutger Hauer is here."

The movie has already been accepted into the Sundance Film Festival in Utah and the International Film Festival Rotterdam in the Netherlands.

The theater was packed with eager, indie moviegoers looking for a chance not only to catch the film but also to chat with Hauer, 69.

The audience asked questions about the film itself and the independent film industry.

"Festivals like this are really important," Hauer said. "Sometimes it's about art. Sometimes we make art."

Laurie O'Connor, of Victoria, agreed.

She had just learned about the film and decided to bring her friend and family with her for the evening.

"Last year, we couldn't fit it into our schedule," she said. "That's why, this year, we've shut off everything to do this all weekend."

Gaona, who was doing it all for the first time, said she now knows why films like this are so popular.

"It's something different," she said. "Each year, I'm sure it will get better and better."

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