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Pick flowers that accent the bride, wedding venue

By Jessica Rodrigo
Jan. 7, 2013 at 11:03 a.m.
Updated Jan. 6, 2013 at 7:07 p.m.

Table flower arrangements, like this small piece  at Devereux Gardens in Victoria, are popular for wedding receptions. Some pieces may include small votive candles or tall tapers.

Types of bouquets

Biedermeier: Concentric rings of blooms fan out from the center of this graphic bouquet, which looks a bit like a flowering bull's-eye when finished.

Hand-tied: The florist wraps the stems with ribbon instead of inserting them into a foam-filled holder.

Nosegay: A tightly packed, round bouquet of blooms.

Pomanders and Wreaths: Ball-shaped pomanders or ringlike wreaths are a fresh twist on the classic bridal bouquet.

Arm Bouquet: This grand bouquet is held flat in the crook of your arm.

Cascade: Flowers drape down from this bouquet. Modern cascades are more compact and don't hang to the ground.

Brides.com

Next to the ring and dress, the bouquet completes the look of the bride as she walks down the aisle.

The options for floral designs may appear nearly endless when it comes to bouquets and arrangements. Devereux designer Carol Simmons said brides-to-be should keep in mind what Mother Nature has in bloom.

"We usually go by the season," she explained. "If it's fall, they're going to want the Leonardis Rose, the chocolates, greens and oranges. They'll include more woodsy colors."

Because Devereux uses fresh flowers and foliage for their bouquets and arrangements, florists there depend on what's growing or what will be in bloom when the wedding is scheduled.

Simmons advised that brides should have an idea of what they want included in their color palette when choosing flower arrangements. The flowers should accent the dresses of the bride and bridal party, as well as match the wedding venue. Arrangements can also include lights or candles that add to the ambiance.

"If it's going to be at the beach, you don't want to go with fall accents. You want something bright and cheery," she said.

Another thing to remember when choosing the flowers for the bouquet is the style of the bouquet. The two common designs are the nosegay and cascade.

The nosegay is a bundle of flowers that is easy for the bride to hold.

The cascade, rightly named for the way the flowers fall from the bouquet, gives a dramatic effect as the flowers extend from bouquet toward the ground.

In her 19 years of experience as a florist, Simmons has developed an eye for what kind of bouquet a bride should have. Brides shouldn't hide behind the bouquet on their wedding day.

She said the bouquet should be proportionate to the bride: If she's a petite bride, she should have a small bouquet.

Jim Rudellat, owner of Port Lavaca Flowers, said he's seen a recent trend in dressing up bouquets with extra adornments.

"(Brides) are putting accents on the handle with fake pearls or diamonds," he said.

Rudellat, who has been in the flower business for 40 years, said people have started to lean toward more expensive flowers, including hydrangeas, lilies and roses.

The flowers that used to be popular but aren't as popular now include carnations, gladiolus and daisies.

He offered a tip for brides who are planning their special day.

"Everyone needs to think in terms of a budget," he said. "Once they have made a decision on a budget, they should try to stay within that."

He added that he has seen more people go all out for their wedding, who spend more money than they are expecting.

"The overall impression is more important than the individual flower," he said. "You can create a great overall impression with less expense if you try."

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