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Residents react to not-guilty verdict

July 15, 2013 at 2:15 a.m.


How do you feel about the non-guilty verdict for George Zimmerman?

"I don't understand that, me as a father, if my son leaves home to go get a drink and a pack of skittles and he ends up dead - how can you justify that? I don't care if you are green or blue or what ever. ...I personally think that the justice system should have done more than what they did."

Mackie Moore, Victoria, rancher and youth pastor

"I am amazed Zimmerman was not convicted. Obama wants him convicted; Holder wants him convicted. Those women jurors were courageous for what they did. Zimmerman should not have been convicted."

Woody Hawkins, Victoria, retired

"In my opinion, since I am a concealed handgun license holder and took the course on self defense and how to recognize those situations, I felt Zimmerman was justified. It is easy to look at it after, but in the moment, with the tensions high, it is hard to know what I would have done. It is a sad situation, but I believe it was self defense."

Jonathan Carmona, Victoria, youth pastor

"I know it is ridiculous that this guy got away with murder. I don't think it is right, there had to be race involved."

Carrie Campos, Berclair, supervisor

NEW YORK (AP) - With chants and prayers, sermons and signs, outrage over a jury's decision to clear George Zimmerman in the shooting of an unarmed black teenager poured from street protests and church pulpits Sunday amid calls for federal civil rights charges to be filed in the case.

Demonstrations large and small broke out across the country - ranging from a few dozen to several hundred - in support of the family of Trayvon Martin as protesters decried the not guilty verdict as a miscarriage of justice.

The NAACP and protesters called for federal civil rights charges against Zimmerman, who was acquitted Saturday in Martin's February 2012 shooting death, which unleashed a national debate over racial profiling, self-defense and equal justice.

The Justice Department said it is looking into the case to determine whether federal prosecutors should file criminal civil rights charges now that Zimmerman has been acquitted in the state case. Meanwhile, President Barack Obama and religious and civil rights leaders urged calm in hopes of ensuring peaceful demonstrations in the wake of a case that became an emotional flash point.

At Manhattan's Middle Collegiate Church, many congregants wore hooded sweatshirts - the same thing Martin was wearing the night he was shot. Hoodie-clad Jessica Nacinovich said she could only feel disappointment and sadness over the verdict.

"I'm sure jurors did what they felt was right in accordance with the law, but maybe the law is wrong, maybe society is wrong. There's a lot that needs fixing," she said.

The Rev. Jacqueline Lewis, wearing a pink hoodie, urged a peaceful but vocal response.

"We're going to raise our voices against the root causes of this kind of tragedy," she said, adding, "We'll aim our fight for justice against the ease with which people can get firearms in this country."

At a youth service in Sanford, Fla., where the trial was held, teens wearing shirts displaying Martin's picture wiped away tears during a sermon at the St. Paul Missionary Baptist Church.

About 200 people turned out for a rally and march in downtown Chicago, saying the verdict was symbolic of lingering racism in the United States. Seventy-three-year-old Maya Miller said the case reminded her of the 1955 slaying of Emmitt Till, a 14-year-old from Chicago who was murdered by a group of white men while visiting Mississippi. Till's killing galvanized the civil rights movement.

"Fifty-eight years and nothing's changed," Miller said, pausing to join a chant to "Justice for Trayvon, not one more."

Protesters also gathered in Miami, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C., along with a host of other cities.

Hours after the verdict Saturday night, demonstrators gathered on U Street in Washington, D.C., chanting, "No justice, no peace." One protester carried a sign that read, "Stop criminalizing black men."

In Miami, more than 200 people gathered for a vigil. "You can't justify murder," read one poster. Another read "Don't worry about more riots. Worry about more Zimmermans."

Carol Reitner, 76, of Miami, said she heard about the vigil through an announcement at her church Sunday morning. "I was really devastated. It's really hard to believe that someone can take the life of someone else and walk out of court free," she said.

In Manhattan's Union Square, hundreds of people gathered to voice their passions over the verdict, hoisting placards with images of Martin.

Some tempered their anger, saying they didn't contest the jury's decision based on the legal issues involved.

But "while the verdict may be legal, a system that doesn't take into account what happened is a broken legal system," said Jennifer Lue, 24.

Civil rights leaders, including the Revs. Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton, urged peace in the wake of the verdict. Jackson said the legal system "failed justice," but violence isn't the answer.

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