Tuesday, October 21, 2014




Advertise with us

Austin band drums into Bach Festival (video)

By Bianca Montes
June 6, 2013 at 1:06 a.m.
Updated June 7, 2013 at 1:07 a.m.

Percussion group line upon line, from left, Matthew Teodori, Cullen Faulk and Adam Bedell  perform at the Golden Gecko in Victoria. The group performed as part of the Victoria  Bach Festival on  Thursday afternoon.

Big Bang

Want to learn how to bang around like line upon line? On Saturday, some Bach Festival performers will head over to the Victoria Public Library at 1 p.m. for a rhythm party.

Epic - that is how 12-year-old Emery Flores described the pounding performance by Austin-based percussionists line upon line.

The band played Thursday during Bach Festival's noon showcase at the Golden Gecko in downtown Victoria.

The trio - Adam Bedell, 28, Matt Teodori, 27, and Cullen Faulk, 26 - said they aspire to push the boundaries of percussion music in the classical world.

"We think of it very much as a continuation," Teodori said. "I think also there are some things that aren't as traditional about it, which I think we really embrace and enjoy."

The band performed four pieces during its showcase, opening with a percussion staple called phasing. Phasing required each member to rotate in and out of a synchronized pattern.

"It was inspiring," Emery, who plays percussion at Patti Welder Middle School, said.

Teodori said the process is more than a thousand years old and not as difficult as it looks.

Faulk, who is a Victoria native, said it was amazing to return to his hometown and show off to some familiar faces.

"It's good to show them that this isn't a pipe dream," he said.

His aunt, Lane Bryscho, of Yorktown, said she'd never seen Faulk perform live.

"I don't know what I was expecting," she said. "It was unique. Dynamic."

Her favorite was a commissioned work by composer Steve Snowden titled "A Man with a Gun Lives Here."

The piece was inspired by the markings hobos would post around the cities during the Great Depression.

"That one touched me the most," she said.

The band used brushes to create whisk-like sounds in the air and poured bird shot over a drum for depth to the piece.

"Percussion just means to hit," Bedell said. "Anything that we can hit is an instrument to us."

SHARE

Comments


THE LATEST

Powered By AdvocateDigitalMedia