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Festival teaches children about music comunication (video)

By Bianca Montes
June 8, 2013 at 1:08 a.m.
Updated June 9, 2013 at 1:09 a.m.


Did you know?

The drum circle is the oldest form of community building known to the world. More than 6,000 years ago, it is how Neolithic Age tribes communicated to each other.

Source: mademan.com

The echoing sound of drums rumbled through Victoria Public Library on Saturday as part of the Victoria Bach Festival's closing events.

The culprit: about 20 pairs of little hands banging away on the drums, congas and other percussion instruments.

Inside the Bronte Room of the library, children of all ages - and a few adults - participated in Bach Festival's 2013 Big Bang drum circle.

The session was led by Ross Weckesser, director of percussion at West High School.

Weckesser said the drum circle is one of the oldest forms of communication.

"Drum circles are a very organic experience," he said. "It's very easy to connect with the music. Anybody can just follow along."

Grace Harrison was a natural. The 6-year-old took her turn playing several instruments, but her favorite was the snare drum.

When asked why she liked it, she said, "Boom. Boom. Boom."

The children participated in several lessons during the drum circle that taught them about patterns, counting and music.

Emily Harrison, Grace's mother, said the drum circle was a good developmental activity for children.

"Having them just feel and hear the instruments is educational," she said.

Weckesser said he wants the children to take away the lesson that even if you're not a musician, you can still appreciate music.

"If they walk away having enjoyed it," he said, "that's what it's all about.

"As long as they have fun and make music."

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