Tuesday, September 16, 2014




Never Records joins stage at Victoria Texas Independent Film Festival

By Jessica Rodrigo
March 27, 2013 at 2:03 p.m.
Updated March 26, 2013 at 10:27 p.m.

Teddy Riederer records live music onto turntables. He is bringing a small scale of his production to Victoria for the upcoming film festival, where he will cut vinyl records on site.

Get a glimpse

To get more acquainted with Ted Riederer, visit tedriederer.com or neverrecords.net, or vtxiff.com.

Watch the film

• WHAT: "Never Records: You Are Not Listening"

• WHEN: 8 p.m. April 4

•  WHERE: Grassy area between the Children's Discovery Museum and Junior League building

• WHAT: Live music and recording with Kevin Grant

• WHEN: 7 p.m. April 4

The Victoria TX Independent Film Festival will play host to more than just actors and directors on the silver screen at this year's four-day event. The proof lies in the science that Teddy Riederer lives by.

The musician and artist from New York's East Village is joining the second annual film festival in three capacities - as an artist, a vinyl-creator and to watch the premiere of a film he is featured in.

Riederer, 42, along with film director Jason Wyche, will premiere "Never Records: You Are Not Listening," which was filmed in Derry, Ireland, and documented his work on an art installation.

"The movie has a lot of references to the political struggles there and how music kind of unites everybody," he said.

As part of the newly added music and art portion of the festival, Riederer, who is the mastermind behind the Never Records music project, will produce three records. One for his library, one for Pedone and one will be auctioned out to benefit the nonprofit group Golden Crescent CASA.

He expects to record music from 10 to 15 performances during the festival on his vinyl record cutter.

Normally, he said, he sets up a temporary record shop where he cuts vinyl in an open call setting, where he doesn't schedule the musicians but instead allows them to come to him. In the end, he walks away with a one-of-a-kind record and hands one off to the musicians.

"It's so much fun showing people the process," he said of the science of etching sound waves into vinyl. "It's really wonderful to watch the expression on people's faces and how happy they are."

"(Vinyl) will never go away, it's such a perfect scientific process. It's just sound waves etched into whatever acetate or plastic we use. ... It puts the magic back into it."

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