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Victoria Symphony joins the circus for big top performance (video)

By Bianca Montes
Sept. 11, 2013 at 4:11 a.m.
Updated Sept. 12, 2013 at 4:12 a.m.

Performer Christina Van Loo hangs above a symphony event. She, along with trumpet player Ron Ledbetter, will demonstrate her skills during the Cirque de la Symphonie show on Saturday at the Victoria Fine Arts Center. Read more about the show in Get Out, E6-7.

If you go

• WHAT: Cirque de la Symphonie

• WHEN: 7:30 p.m. Saturday

• WHERE: Victoria Fine Arts Center, 1002 Sam Houston Dr., Victoria

• COST: $18-$35

• FOR INFORMATION: Contact the Victoria Symphony at 361-576-4500.

Growing up, Ron Ledbetter knew he was going to be a trumpeter. The love for the dark brass horn was deeply nestled in his genes, being that both his father and his grandfather were players. But, if you were to ask the man if he'd ever imagined being a part of the circus, he'd laugh at you before blatantly saying, "probably not."

Just because he didn't dream of walking tightropes or juggling various objects to the soundtrack of fat little children laughing with the remnants of cotton candy dripping from their round, rosy cheeks doesn't mean his bacchanal fate was sealed.

On Saturday, Ledbetter and the 62-piece Victoria Symphony will once again toss their hats into the ring and join the circus.

Cirque de la Symphonie, a traveling road show, takes the magical big top performances and sets them to the rich tones of a full orchestra.

From the aerial flyer to the classical works of Strauss and Tchaikovsky, the show "comes to life," said Michelle Hall, executive director of Victoria Symphony.

"It's just fascinating the way they move their bodies," she said about the cirque performers. "It doesn't seem like it is physically possible."

Ledbetter, who performs as principal trumpet with the symphony, said despite a lifetime of experience, at times, he almost forgot he was there to play music and not watch the show.

"The hardest thing is to not be distracted," he said. "We don't play every note of every song in the brass section, and it's easy to get wrapped up in what they're doing and not the music. We're not used to having folks fly over head when we're performing."

Related stories:

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Four decades of music, community pride

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