Riding the trail to Houston

David Ramirez, of Highlands, left, and his brother, Sal, of Livingston, work to replace the rubber wheels on one of the Los Vaqueros Rio Grande Trail Ride Association wagons with traditional ones at Friday night's campsite near the Victoria Regional Airport. Trail riding rules require that the last leg of the trip has to be done authentically with wooden wheels and riders in Western wear. The Ramirez brothers have been making the 386-mile trip from Hidalgo to Houston with their father, who started the ride, every year since the first ride 41 years ago. David said the ride, which takes 21 days, is the longest continuous trail ride in the country.
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David Ramirez, of Highlands, left, and his brother, Sal, of Livingston, work to replace the rubber wheels on one of the Los Vaqueros Rio Grande Trail Ride Association wagons with traditional ones at Friday night's campsite near the Victoria Regional Airport. Trail riding rules require that the last leg of the trip has to be done authentically with wooden wheels and riders in Western wear. The Ramirez brothers have been making the 386-mile trip from Hidalgo to Houston with their father, who started the ride, every year since the first ride 41 years ago. David said the ride, which takes 21 days, is the longest continuous trail ride in the country.



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