Response to letter reflects condition of world

Editor, the Advocate:

Regarding the letter to the editor in the Feb. 23 Advocate in which the writer refers to Pastor Fisher's Saturday Sermon "The conscience of a nation," which ran in the Advocate Feb. 15, I find it so terribly sad that some call the truth "hate."

I guess it is because, as the old saying goes, truth hurts. It seems that the all-too-frequent response to conscience these days is anger and hatred toward anyone who would speak truth.

So, just as the Bible promised, there has come a time when that which is good is called "evil" and that which is evil is called "good." In this age of liberalism and political correctness, everything is acceptable - except God's truth.

And those who choose to adhere to God's truth are accused of being hateful.

Thank you, Pastor Fisher, for boldly speaking Biblical truth. Those who know the word of God know that Jesus said, "Do you think I have come to bring peace to the earth? No, I have come to divide people against each other." (Luke 12:51, NLT) Why? In John 9:39, Jesus said, "I entered this world to render judgment - to give sight to the blind and to show those who think they see that they are blind."

For those who call themselves Christians, the Bible teaches that there is only one way to salvation and that out of salvation Christians will live godly lives that exhibit the "fruits of the spirit." Out of love, Christians want to share salvation with those around them, but since there is only one way to salvation, Christians are called narrow-minded.

Still, for anyone who chooses not to accept what the Christian faith offers, from that perspective, what have they lost? No Christian has the power or ability to condemn anyone to hell, much less a hell that one does not believe in.

Even if Christianity was wrong, I would rather live a good and godly life with hope of heaven and belief in the ultimate good of God.

Sharon Nelson, Victoria