AnonymousUser

BobbyTomek

Comment history

  • BobbyTomek 

    "The Advocate's policy is not to identify the victims of sexual assault."

    Really??? Yet you'll publish the name of the road, mention the approximate location, print a photo of the place in question and identify the neighbor. You may as well list the phone numbers, too.

    Flag this comment

  • BobbyTomek 

    "Bay City substitute teacher sentenced to in prison for threats"

    Here's another headline needing a bit of work. It took all of 20 seconds to look at the site to see these, and yet they stood for HOURS without being corrected.

    Flag this comment

  • BobbyTomek 

    Someone may want to try and proof that headline :)

    Flag this comment

  • BobbyTomek 

    The Advocate's decision to publish the photo was the correct one. But to run it in color was in poor, poor taste and leads one to again question so-called credibility versus sensationalism. Running the photo in black and white would have accomplished the Advocate's intent while minimizing the graphic nature of the scene. It simply boils down to a matter of comon sense.

    Flag this comment

  • BobbyTomek 

    First off, that’s a great photo, Frank – and certainly one of the better football shots you’ve captured over the years.

    While my health has taken me out of the game for some time now, I’ve been fortunate enough to shoot a conservatively-estimated 700 football games over the years ranging from junior high through the professional ranks. I’ve never been knocked down or injured in any form or fashion, though I did have action right atop my shoestrings a few times. I’d actually say basketball represents more of a threat of being hit or injured as confined spaces in some of the smaller gyms make photography somewhat of a nightmare.

    In football, if you understand the game and are cognizant of the flow, the down and the penchant of either team to execute a certain play, you can anticipate with relative certainty when and where the action will transpire and keep yourself out of harm’s way. That’s also how you are able to record the most captivating photos.

    Perhaps I interpret the approach differently than some do as I entered the arena many years ago as a sports editor who preferred to cover games while shooting them at the same time. Particularly with the deadlines of a daily, that can be challenging but certainly not impossible. In fact, my stint at a north Texas daily, where I not only covered the events as sports editor but photographed them as well, is something I regard as some of the most memorable and enjoyable times of my entire career.

    But in the late 80s, when the Advocate contacted me out of the blue and wanted me to work solely as a photographer, I accepted. It was then that I began to take notice of how others approach the game; after all, I now had free time on my hands as I was only responsible shooting the event.

    The common denominator I noticed among the ranks – from novice through seasoned professionals – is that many of the press members tend to move en masse and all wind up with similar shots. I never cared for that – particularly not the chit-chat which often transpired – as I preferred to devote my full attention to the matters at hand. And, rarely shooting with anything shorter than a 300mm lens, I was able to separate myself from the crowded hotspots and still pull in the action I was there to capture.

    And that’s how Frank captured this moment in time: by thinking ahead, anticipating the action and getting away from the traditional bottlenecks of media members hugging the first down markers.

    Well done, Frank…

    Flag this comment

  • BobbyTomek 

    Nicely done. Thanks for mentioning the uniqueness of the spot pattern. Many folks don't realize that about the ocelot.

    Flag this comment

  • BobbyTomek 

    TxBohemian wrote: “But what if this is a new breed that evolved recently? If we all had this kind of mentality we'd still be living in caves!!”
    ---

    If we couldn’t detect the presence of mange (it’s NOT rocket science) and recognize what is obviously a suffering animal, then we’d DESERVE to still be living in caves.

    Lab testing has previously confirmed that these are indeed wild canines with mange – as simple as that. During the past several years, reported incidents of mange in coyotes and foxes have become more prominent, and the results – as one can clearly see in this or any of the other photos on the subject – are devastating.

    Flag this comment

  • BobbyTomek 

    born2Bme-

    My reading comprehension is anything but lacking. The bottom line is THIS: a suffering animal was given relief, no matter what emotional spin you try and put on it.

    By the way, were you among those who stood boldly -- hiding behind computer anonymity -- and took cheap shots at a 13-year-old child? As an aside, thank you, Advocate, for removing such unnecessary attacks.

    Flag this comment

  • BobbyTomek 

    Mycatsnuffy wrote: “I agree with sugar and born. Such a sad thing for an animal to lose it's life because a child (yes, a CHILD, at age 13) decided that it would be more fun to kill it than learn from “ 

    Perhaps YOU and some of the other posters could learn a thing or two here, like what MANGE does to an animal. Have you ever seen an emaciated animal covered in sores and driven literally insane by the presence and continual itching of mange? In latter stages, the animal can’t rest, stays on the move constantly and literally runs itself to death out of sheer frustration.

    From the Michigan Department of Natural Resources: “Sarcoptic mange is a serious disease in many animals. Severe infections result in drastic changes in the skin and evidence of ill health in the host. The disease seems particularly pathologic to foxes, especially in pups in the summer. The hair becomes sparse, the skin inflamed and irritated. Tissue serum and pus resulting from bacterial infection in the damaged skin combine to form a thick, odorous crust over the affected areas. Skin changes around the eyes, ears and mouth may cause blindness, impaired hearing and difficulty in eating. The disease is often fatal…”
    ---

    But, mycatsnuffy, if you are truly serious about your statement, how’s this: I’ll put out a few soft-jawed #3 coilsprings and catch and provide a mange-infested coyote. Arrangements can be made through the state and whatever institution or agency agrees to facilitate your project. And as long as you provide all of the coyote’s necessary medical treatment and cover all of the expenses, that “learning” process you mention can become a reality for anyone interested. 

    Otherwise, I’ll shoot every mange-infested coyote I see and end the suffering – not to mention taking out a link in the spread of the disease. You know, you were on the right track when you said there is something “sad” here, but it’s actually how bleeding hearts think with emotion instead of utilizing logic and common sense to analyze simple situations. 

    As to the teenager who shot the coyote, someone please pass him another box of ammo.

    Flag this comment

  • BobbyTomek 

    Not only does DeWitt County owe Mr. Rodriguez the public apology, they should pick up the tab for his bail money and lost wages as well, though the way "government" operates, I don't see that happening. And they should also have to run at least a quarter-page ad in every area paper in an effort to clear the name of the wrongly-accused individual.

    This lapse in judgment not only cost Mr. Rodriguez his job and livelihood but will have long-term repercussions as well.

    Flag this comment

Previous