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TrystaEakin

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  • TrystaEakin 

    While seemingly rare, many people are just simply not diagnosed. They die from strokes or clots without it ever being discovered, or go their whole lives with complications that have no apparent explanation. I don't think my current doctor even really knows what the disorder is, but was present enough to run a panel of blood tests and saw this obscure protein was low.

    With the many ailments, diseases and disorders out there, doctors can hardly know everything at all times. But to have the courtesy to be honest about that and keep vigilance over their patients' health, referring them to other doctors when necessary, that is the mark of a good human being and physician.

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  • TrystaEakin 

    @trixie50: I think you're right. Patients have to put so much time and effort into their own care because many doctors don't have time and effort to put into them. Unfortunately, instead of admitting "I don't know what's wrong with you. Let me refer you to someone else," some doctors come up with what seems like an off-the-wall answer, invalidating your feelings in the process, and just prescribes medication to get you out of their hair.

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  • TrystaEakin 

    Thank you all for commenting. We won't all have the same opinions and we shouldn't. But I think we can be constructive by just talking about it and acknowledging the sources of the problems we face as a nation.

    Usesomelogic, I'm glad that you brought up that the solution doesn't necessarily start with giving poor people more money. While that would be great in a perfect world - if we just had millions to give away - but we wouldn't be learning anything, would we? It's the "teach a man to fish" principle.

    On the other hand, sometimes you need a hand up, someone to acknowledge that you're struggling to maintain your money, family and sanity. It's not cut and dry. What looks like $1,000 is really $200 after taxes, rent, utilities, child care, food, clothes, toilet paper, etc.

    I was born into a very poor family. My parents, grandparents, great-grandparents. I am a first generation high school AND college graduate. I realize not so many are as fortunate to break the cycle. Most members of my family work hard, while others have given up and simply live off the government as described by usesomelogic.

    By 16, to save my family money, I lived on my own and worked full time while technically graduating from high school two years early. I NEVER want to endure that kind of hard work again. By the time I was done, all hope had been sucked out of me. I could have easily given up, but I found the strength to continue on to college. And here I am today.

    So the topic of poverty both perplexes me and saddens me. There are no hard and fast rules. I think, though, in my position as a journalist, it's my job to bring up these issues and encourage conversation.

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  • TrystaEakin 

    With more than 100 views, somebody here has to have some suggestions about poverty prevention. One hundred minds are better than one, right?

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  • TrystaEakin 

    C'mon Jared. I know you have more insight into the poverty problem. While we may not always agree on some things, I know you take time to think about issues. What can we do to get really really poor people off the dependency of the government and moderately poor people in a better position?

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  • TrystaEakin 

    Oh believe me holein1, I've thought about that a lot. And I think that's a personal decision for each couple to make. What's right for me might not be so for someone else.

    But in my situation, I'm newly married (just three months ago next week) and only 27. I do, however, have some complications with a blood disorder called S-protein deficiency that affects pregnancy. Which will likely prove to be financially and physically taxing. So I can't wait too long, but long enough to be fiscally responsible.

    When I see babies, my womb calls out to me VERY loudly! But I think I'll know when the timing is right. And it will be a leap of faith, not only in myself, but in my husband and my job and the school system and a million other things that I can stay up nights worrying about. lol.

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  • TrystaEakin 

    I believe you're right Newcowboy. We live in a fast-food society, where lines of credit, bailouts and instant gratification are par for the course. I can't say that I'm not guilty, though. I have debt I accrued in my late teens/early 20s that I'm still paying off. When I didn't know any better. Luckily, however, when I was 16 and the other girls were saying how awesome it would be to have the unconditional love of a baby, I had a newborn brother and saw first-hand how difficult it is to raise a child on very little money.

    How can we reproduce that lesson, among others, so young adults and teens can make better choices? What is the root of poverty? Education, work ethic, debt, health, policies, irresponsibility?

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  • TrystaEakin 

    You're so awesome, Jennifer! What a feat to get this kind of support and event together. Great job and good luck. You can bet I'll be rummaging through my closet for some shoes to bring.

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  • TrystaEakin 

    N45BA: It is true, the play is not for everyone. Its adult themes and depictions of sexuality doesn't necessarily jive with some people's beliefs. So no one would blame you for not going; in fact no one would blame you for not reading this blog either. With one click, you can navigate safely from this page and return to your life, which hopefully has nothing to do with abuse or controversial theatrical performances.

    What concerns me, however, is the anger you're emanating, directed seemingly toward women. I encourage you to explore that within yourself as anger can oftentimes be more toxic to ourselves than anyone else.

    And please be respectful of the people posting here on my blog. I want this to be a place where people can safely, and positively, share their experiences and point of view. Unlike the news stories on this site, I have the liberty of removing any comments that overstep the boundaries I have set.

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  • TrystaEakin 

    I realized that my username, teakin, may be a bit misleading. When I first started working for the Victoria Advocate and set up my account, I chose my e-mail moniker for that. I changed it so there would be no mistaking of my identity. I am a reporter, a wife, a daughter, a sister and a sexual abuse survivor.

    Trysta Eakin
    teakin@vicad.com
    580-6538

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