Blogs » Pop Goes the Culture » Goodbye Bat Nipples, Hello Oscar...

Subscribe


Image

Well, in case there was ever any, last night proved beyond a shadow of a doubt that I am 100 percent geek. (Although in my defense, my boyfriend is also a major geek, and we have an enabling relationship that allows both of us to indulge in our geekiness fully).

But I digress.

Last night, we went to the movies and ended up spending almost six hours there. It started out simply enough with us going to see Hellboy II (because as if my own geeky tendencies toward geek staples such as "Lord of the Rings," Star Wars," and "Star Trek" weren't enough, the aforementioned boyfriend got me hooked on comic books as well).

But one movie just wasn't enough for us to get our fill and so we ended up staying and seeing the late showing of "The Dark Knight" as well.

Now I won't bore you with my review, considering there are approximately 84 billion "Dark Knight" reviews out there already (and considering the fact that my only complaint about the movie is Christian Bale is not shirtless nearly enough). But I did want to throw in my two cents about how comic book movies have reached a new level of cinematic excellence.

Thanks to people like Joel Schumacher and his brilliant idea of Bat Nipples and horrific puns (Mr. Freeze alone whips out gems like "Chill!" and "Ice to see you" in "Batman and Robin"), this genre of movies almost died. Halle Berry in "Catwoman" didn't help matters much and for awhile it seemed that comic book movies would never be taken seriously.

But then came "Batman Begins," "Superman Returns" and "Iron Man," which restored our faith in this genre. Not only did these movies blow up at the box office, but they single-handedly brought back Robert Downey Jr.'s career and made Christian Bale and Brandon Routh household names.

And now with Oscar buzz surrounding Heath Ledger's performance as The Joker (which is well deserved in my oh-so-humble opinion) it finally seems that the critics and the industry are paying their respects to this genre. Gone are the days of campy superhero movies with too much emphasis on tights and capes, and not enough on the characters themselves.

And for us fans of comic books and these characters, all we can say is it's about time. Regardless of whether you read comic books or not, there's a reason these stories about these characters have endured over the years. They have universal appeal and speak to us on several different levels. They are the characters we can always turn to when we need an escape from our own mad, crazy world.

And it's about time we started treating these characters like the heroes they are.