Comments


  • Music is ruining Music. I mean pre-1998 era, 2008, and 2003 were great years for my music listening. All it is now is punks and wimps. Chris Brown and Lady Gala are prime examples.

    July 2, 2010 at 8:17 p.m.

  • Will do! Thanks SugarM!

    July 2, 2010 at 4:08 p.m.

  • holein1 - Midnite Rambler is still in business and is listed in the phone book. Kyle C, call him up or visit him just off the corner of Navarro and North Street, by Bill's Bikes, and tell him SugarMagnolia sent you. :)

    July 2, 2010 at 4 p.m.

  • there's a guy, Midnight Rambler, that had some old vinyl in the past. not sure if he still has any, it's been awhile since i ventured into the store. perhaps you could find another copy to take its place for now.

    July 1, 2010 at 12:17 p.m.

  • It's approximately 5000 miles away in storage

    July 1, 2010 at 11:19 a.m.

  • what happened to your copy kyle?

    July 1, 2010 at 11:17 a.m.

  • Sigh, I owned a mint vinyl copy of Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon in recorded in quadraphonic sound. The "Any Colour You Like" track regularly used to blow my mind away.

    Those were the days

    July 1, 2010 at 1:01 a.m.

  • I kinda miss stereo recordings.Example: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kEbEMj...
    shift the balance to the left and see how much of the song you miss. and quadrophonic sound? hard to get that from ear buds..
    I remember when CD's came out, people complained about the sound versus cassettes and LPs.
    But then again, my Dad said the REAL sound was only found on 78's.
    I like being able to carry hours worth of music on a device that is the size of a cigarette lighter.

    July 1, 2010 at 12:52 a.m.

  • I used to scream along to LPs and cassettes, (heck, even 8-tracks). The digital wave and all the neat gadgets it has spawned is moving forward radically. Along the way sound quality has been comprimised. I also think the quality problem will eventually be fixxed though. For now, I'm steering clear of the mp3 format, except my own DIY productions that are distributed online.

    I once put my entire body of works into a high end (?) mp3 player. Being an audio affectionado, I was very, very, very dissappointed in the quality.

    On the 'B' side (Your humor was not lost on me), I'm sure my amature escapades into rock music and my recording techniques are somewhat to blame as well.

    June 29, 2010 at 8:11 a.m.

  • Yes and no. The sound quality has greatly improved. The music may be engineered for MP3, but it's still digital. Analog did not do music any favors. I actually think the sound quality is the best it has ever been.

    On the flip side, I miss the sound of vinyl and cassette tapes. Vinyl especially. There is something magical and nostalgic about the hiss and crackle of the diamond tip needle as it passes over the grooves of a hot-press LP.

    I grew up with that sound. My parents have an awesome record collection. Every once in awhile, after the wine as flowed like the waters of the Guadalupe, we dive in to the records and play dj. I'll miss those days.

    The other thing that is being killed by technology is cover art. The album cover was an essential tool to the experience of the music. I still dig checking out the covers while listening. In some instances they could transport you to another dimension or time through visual art, while the music did the same through sound. In at least once instance, as a young man, I learned a little about beauty of the female form from a album cover.

    One of the big plusses is exposure to new music and artists. The websites have programs that can suggest music you may like based on your previous selections. Something like that just wasn't found in the Disc Jockey, FYE, etc. You can still find it in the endangered mom & pop type music stores.

    Over all I guess technology is good for music. The show must go on, and who knows, maybe in the future we'll have 3-D holograms that pop up when music played, people will engineer the hiss and pop of vinyl records into music.

    One thing I didn't bring up was the impact it has on talent. These days you really don't have to actually have any. They can make the mating sounds of cats sound great.

    June 28, 2010 at 3:59 p.m.

  • I do miss the visual and tactile experience of aquiring a large vinyl collection and the social aspect of gathering around the record player to listen to music. That can be countered somewhat with the flexability, portability and fidelity of music today but listening to music today certainly feels a more perfunctory experience that lacks the warmth of days gone by

    June 28, 2010 at 3:07 p.m.