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While working on a collaborative St. Patrick’s Day project at the office, I somehow managed to pull these stream-of-consciousness limericks off the top of my head:

There once was a woman from Rome,
But she didn’t feel that was her home.
So she left on a bus
And without a great fuss,
She found herself freezing in Gnome.


There once was a boy in my class
Whose attitude was very crass.
He always told bad jokes,
He stole the teachers’ smokes,
Hence, the sixth grade he didn’t pass.


Not too shabby, if I may toot my own horn. Actually, limericks are quite easy to compose. Each limerick contains 5 lines, all of which must follow one of these two syllable patterns:

8 syllables
8 syllables
6 syllables
6 syllables
8 syllables

Or

9 syllables
9 syllables
6 syllables
6 syllables
9 syllables

The rhyme scheme is as follows: AABBA. In other words, lines 1, 2, and 5 must rhyme with each other, and lines 3 and 4 must rhyme with each other.

Here’s a limerick I wrote—rather quickly, I must say—about our Vicad blogs:

There once were some blogs on Vicad’s site
Whose authors really knew how to write
About tech, news, strife, war
The feds, music, and more
While never seeming boring or trite.


Can you write limericks? I’d be delighted to see some of your creativity in the comments section below. Oh, and please keep them clean, even though the dirty ones are indeed hilarious!