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This November 2nd all voters in the State of Texas will have an opportunity to vote for the judge. Actually there are sixteen judges on the Victoria County ballot. These include judges who sit on the Texas Supreme Court, the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals, District Appeals Court, State District Courts, County Courts and Justice of the Peace Courts.

By statute the Texas Supreme Court has administrative control over the State Bar of Texas. The Court is also the sole authority for licensing attorneys in Texas and appoints the members of the Board of Law Examiners which administers the Texas bar examination. The Court promulgates the Texas Rules of Civil Procedure, the Texas Rules of Appellate Procedure, the Texas Rules of Evidence and other rules and standards. (information taken from Texas Courts Online)

Offices up for election this year are; Justice, Supreme Court, Place 3, Justice, Supreme Court, Place 5, and Justice, Supreme Court, Place 9.

The Court of Criminal Appeals is Texas' highest court for criminal cases. After a trial court has decided a criminal case, the State or the defendant may appeal to a higher court. The appeals of all cases in which the death penalty has been assessed come directly to the Court of Criminal Appeals from the trial courts. The appeals of all other criminal cases go to one of the fourteen Courts of Appeals in Texas, and their decisions may be reviewed by the Court of Criminal Appeals. The Court also has sole authority to grant the writ of habeas corpus to a person who has been convicted of a felony (which is a crime that is punishable by death or by imprisonment in the Department of Criminal Justice). In addition to its caseload, the Court of Criminal Appeals has the responsibilities to: promulgate rules of evidence for the trials of criminal cases, promulgate rules of appellate procedure for criminal cases, and administer public funds that are appropriated for the education of the judges and lawyers of Texas. (information taken from Texas Courts Online)

Offices up for election this year are; Judge, Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 2, Judge, Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 5, Judge, Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 6

The Thirteenth Court of Appeals District has intermediate appellate jurisdiction in both civil and criminal cases appealed from lower courts; in civil cases where the judgment exceeds $100, exclusive of costs, and in criminal cases, except in post-conviction writs of habeas corpus and where the death penalty has been imposed. (information taken from Texas Courts Online)

Office up for election this year are; Justice, 13th Court of Appeals District, Place 3

The district courts are the trial courts of general jurisdiction of Texas. The geographical area served by each court is established by the Legislature, but each county must be served by at least one district court. In sparsely populated areas of the State, several counties may be served by a single district court, while an urban county may be served by many district courts.

District courts have original jurisdiction in all felony criminal cases, divorce cases, cases involving title to land, election contest cases, civil matters in which the amount in controversy (the amount of money or damages involved) is $200 or more, and any matters in which jurisdiction is not placed in another trial court. While most district courts try both criminal and civil cases, in the more densely populated counties the courts may specialize in civil, criminal, juvenile, or family law matters. (information taken from Texas Courts Online)

Offices up for election this year are; District Judge, 267th Judicial District and District Judge, 377th Judicial District

As provided in the Texas Constitution, each of the 254 counties of the State has a single county court presided over by a county judge. These courts have concurrent jurisdiction with justice of the peace and district courts in civil cases in which the amount in controversy is small. Jurisdiction is said to be concurrent when two levels of courts have authority to try the same type of case.

The constitutional county courts generally hear the probate cases filed in the county. They have original jurisdiction over all Class A and Class B misdemeanor criminal cases, which are the more serious minor offenses. These courts usually have appellate jurisdiction in cases appealed from justice of the peace and municipal courts, except in counties where county courts at law have been established. Unless the appeal is one from a designated municipal court of record (trial proceedings are recorded by a court reporter), the appeal takes the form of a trial de novo (a completely new trial).

In addition to performing judicial functions, the county judge serves as the administrative head of the county government. In the more populated counties, the administrative duties occupy most of the time of the county judge, and the Legislature has created county courts at law and statutory probate courts to relieve the county judge of most, and in some cases all, of the judicial duties usually performed by that office. (information taken from Texas Courts Online)

The office of County Judge is up for election this year.

Because the Constitution limits each county to a single county court, the Legislature has created statutory county courts at law in the larger counties to aid the single county court in its judicial functions.

The legal jurisdiction of the special county-level trial courts varies considerably and is established by the statute which creates the particular court. The jurisdiction of statutorily-created county courts at law is usually concurrent with the jurisdiction of the county and district courts in the county.

The civil jurisdiction of most county courts at law varies, but is usually more than that of the justice of the peace courts and less than that of the district courts. County courts at law usually have appellate jurisdiction in cases appealed from justice of the peace and municipal courts. (information taken from Texas Courts Online)

Offices up for election this year are; Judge, County Court At Law No. 1 and Judge, County Court at Law No. 2

Justice of the peace courts have original jurisdiction in Class C misdemeanor criminal cases, which are less serious minor offenses. These courts also have jurisdiction of minor civil matters. A justice of the peace may issue search or arrest warrants, and may serve as the coroner in counties where there is no provision for a medical examiner. These courts also function as small claims courts. (information taken from Texas Courts Online)

Offices up for election this year are; Justice of the Peace, Precinct No. 1, Justice of the Peace, Precinct No. 2, Justice of the Peace, Precinct No. 3, and Justice of the Peace, Precinct No. 4.