SEADRIFT - Sometimes, Charlie and Coy Kouba wondered how on earth they'd finish all 264-plus miles of the Texas Water Safari.

"There were several times throughout the course of the race where, 'Oh we're definitely going to make it,'" Coy Kouba said. "And then six hours later, it'd be like, 'Man, how are we going to get through this?'"

Pain and exhaustion told the Koubas - piloting boat No. 1402, named Still Crazy - to quit the grueling canoe race multiple times.

They were crazy enough to keep going, and now they're finishers.

"You've got to be crazy to want to do this. Everybody I talk to, my friends, they're like, 'What? 260 miles non-stop? 100 hours? Why?'" Coy Kouba said. "I don't know why. You get to spend some quality time with Dad here."

Charlie, 69, and son Coy, 45, crossed the line in Seadrift at 8:44 a.m. Wednesday for a time of 95 hours and 44 minutes. It was the first Water Safari finish for the duo, which entered last year's race but dropped out.

It didn't matter to the Koubas that they were the final boat to complete the 2015 Water Safari. Waiting at the finish line for the men were family members, a pair of plaques and the coveted finisher patches.

"A lot of people would kill for this patch," Victoria resident Ken Startz told the Koubas after they climbed out of the water.

Startz finished the race in a tandem canoe with John Valdivia on Monday and came back to Seadrift on Wednesday to support Victoria resident Charlie and Houston resident Coy.

Startz finished in 50 hours, right about the time aches and hallucinations set in for the Koubas along the Guadalupe River.

"When you start out still crazy, like the name of our boat, it only gets worse," Charlie Kouba said.

The swift water and rapids in the upriver sections had the Koubas dog-tired by the race's midpoint.

"What's really cool, especially on like day two or three, at night, when it gets closer to dark and you're in the river and there's big trees, you see things in the trees that aren't really there," Coy Kouba said.

There's a reason the Victoria boat ramp checkpoint at the 200-mile mark is nicknamed Hallucination Alley.

"Your mind starts to play tricks on you," Coy Kouba said. "It's really cool trying to see what you can spot along the river banks as night approaches."

Team captain Tony Kouba, who endured the same sleep deprivation as the rowers, was asked at how many points he felt concerned for Charlie and Coy.

"How many checkpoints are there?" Tony Kouba asked.

Eleven or 12, he was told.

"I had about 12 concerns," Tony Kouba joked. "There were a couple places there that I had a little concern, but I knew, I had the confidence in them that they would finish."

For checkpoint No. 12 - the finish line in the open bay waters of Seadrift - the Koubas had to adapt when their plan of attack fell through.

"We were trying to hit the window for the calmer bay, from 4 in the morning to 7," Charlie Kouba said.

The Koubas didn't reach the bay until past that point; the waves had gotten choppier then. They paddled, walked a little and did everything they could to get Still Crazy to the end.

"This guy did a super job," Charlie said of his son.

"So did you," Coy replied back.

The father paused for a moment.

"I'm glad we did it," Charlie said.

"I am so glad we did this," Coy added. "I'll never forget it. It's been awesome."

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