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Citizens Medical Center receives 234 state-of-the-art hospital beds

July 20, 2011 at 2:20 a.m.

Citizens Medical Center workers unload the new 234 state-of-the-art hospital beds.

Citizens Medical Center workers unload the new 234 state-of-the-art hospital beds.

No doubt the age of smart technology is here from smart phones to smart cars and to yes, even smart beds.

Citizens Medical Center has 234 new state-of-the-art technology beds in its hospital.

The beds were created by Hill-Rom and will increase patient and nursing safety and satisfaction, said Lynne Voskamp, chief nursing officer.

"It's our way of standardizing beds in our hospital," Voskamp said.

The 214 Advanta beds, which are in most of the units in the hospital, cost $1.4 million and 20 Versacare beds, which are only used on the skilled nursing floor, cost $250,000, said Shannon Spree, the hospital spokeswoman.

The beds trickled into the hospital through several shipments throughout the month, she added.

The beds have plastic railings which allow for more versatility with its functions.

Voskamp pulled a wired panel from the side railing and showed the sensitive touch volume, channel and nurse call controls.

When pulled off the railing, the hard-plastic railing serves as a compartment for a patient's belongings; such as glasses or a cell phone.

The movable panel makes it easier for patients to be comfortable in the bed, Voskamp said.

"It's friendly for nursing staff and our patients," she said.

Railings are also easier for nurses to use.

The mattress has a sensor, which lets nurses know whether a patient has gotten out of the bed, and will help with decreasing any falls.

The beds lower to about 17 inches off the floor, for patients who have trouble getting onto the bed.

Most hospitals change the beds mattresses, but it's only about every 15 years when new beds are purchased, Voskamp said.

The beds have built-in scales to make it easier to weigh patients.

Most of the hospital's units have the beds, but some do not.

"I'm just very glad we did this," Voskamp said.


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