Saturday, August 01, 2015



Advertise with us

The buck stops here

June 30, 2011 at 1:30 a.m.
Updated July 11, 2011 at 2:11 a.m.

While grazing on the green of Riverside Golf Course, a male deer freezes when he spies a photographer hiding behind a tree. The deer are having fawns around this time of year. It is common to see the male deer develop "velvet" on their antlers, which they will later scrape down using brush, and it will harden. The deer enjoy eating the forbs and weeds that grow around the golf course. Parks and Wildlife District Supervisor Rex Mayes said people should not mess with fawns they might find hidden in brush whose mothers have gone to find food.

While grazing on the green of Riverside Golf Course, a male deer freezes when he spies a photographer hiding behind a tree. The deer are having fawns around this time of year. It is common to see the male deer develop "velvet" on their antlers, which they will later scrape down using brush, and it will harden. The deer enjoy eating the forbs and weeds that grow around the golf course. Parks and Wildlife District Supervisor Rex Mayes said people should not mess with fawns they might find hidden in brush whose mothers have gone to find food.

While grazing on the green of Riverside Golf Course, a male deer freezes when he spies a photographer hiding behind a tree. The deer are having fawns around this time of year. It is common to see the male deer develop "velvet" on their antlers, which they will later scrape down on brush and it will harden. The deer enjoy eating the forbs and weeds that grow around the golf course. Parks and Wildlife District Supervisor Rex Mayes said people should not mess with fawns they may find hidden in brush whose mothers have gone to find food.

SHARE


Comments


Powered By AdvocateDigitalMedia