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Contraceptives cause higher risk of death?

March 10, 2012 at 6 p.m.
Updated March 9, 2012 at 9:10 p.m.

Editor, the Advocate:

Yaz, IUD, the Patch and the birth control pill can kill you, blind you and have all kinds of serious medical effects. Natural family planning "pill" has only good side effects. NFP pill is 100 percent safe. And the good news is that it lasts a lifetime. It costs only a fraction of the birth control pill. And it has these wonderful side effects: strengthens your marriage; all natural; you cannot get pregnant (when used correctly) unless it be the will of God! For more information on NFP, contact NFPandmore.org (you and your spouse will be glad you did).

If a girl or woman dies, contraception is never listed as the cause. Yet the death rate for females in the following categories has been steadily rising - not for men - just for women.

According to the Center for Disease Control statistics, these are the death rates for malignant neoplasms of trachea, bronchus, and lung, by sex, race, origin and age, in the United States, selected years 1950-2007 (white females, all ages): 1950 - 5.9 percent, 1980 - 24.5 percent, 2000 - 42.3 percent, 2007 - 41.2 percent.

According to the Royal College of General Practitioners study, women using oral contraceptives have five times greater risk of death from cardiovascular causes.

Five of the pill's side effects are pulmonary embolism, cardiac arrest, hypertensive disease, heart failure and stroke. In 2004 in the United States, the following are the numbers of recorded female deaths for five medical causes: 3,565 deaths for pulmonary embolism; 8,065 deaths for cardiac arrest; 13,748 deaths for heart failure; 16,445 deaths for hypertensive diseases; and 22,658 deaths for stroke.

How many of these women were on the birth control pill? That's a good question. By looking at the U.S. Standard Certificate of Death, it does not ask if the deceased was using any form of birth control. It does, however, ask if tobacco use contributed to death. So why not ask if the deceased was taking any kind of medicine or drugs, such as the birth control pill?

William Paul Tasin, Victoria

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