Friday, March 27, 2015




Advertise with us

Medicare, Social Security have major problems

Oct. 11, 2012 at 5:11 a.m.


Editor, the Advocate:

Medicare is NOT the criminal in the screaming and scheming "balance the budget" cry, as most politicians allude. Medicaid/welfare is the sponge soaking the Medicare program dry. Social Security, as administered, is a scam. Disabled and can't work? Pray you do not qualify for full Social Security. ANY supplemental state income qualifies you for full medical benefits and every existing giveaway program immediately, all siphoned off the SS/Medicare payments you make while working. Disabled and drawing only Social Security, which you paid while working? You have to wait TWO years to be eligible for Medicare, and then opt out or pay a monthly premium. Hopefully, you'll die before you're eligible for Medicare seems the program administrators' plan. Medicaid/welfare recipients are not considered intelligent enough to understand medical insurance concepts, so they are immediately covered and healthcare coverage is not a problem they have to concern themselves with - ever.

You may be suffering with advanced diabetes, heart problems, etc., but as long as you can crawl to work and make $1,000-plus per month, no Medicaid for you. If you claim to be illiterate (which cannot be disproven) and convince the welfare gods of same, you get welfare, Medicaid and all the goodies. How do non-English-speaking illegal immigrants get jobs and Americans claiming illiteracy get welfare? The SS retirement age keeps going up, and retiring early is not a desirable option for the working man. Along with lesser SS benefit payments, you WILL NOT qualify for Medicare until you reach full government-sanctioned retirement age, whatever it is. If you're not super rich, it is far better to be (or claim to be) super poor. One more slap-down for the working class! The rich won't pay; the poor don't pay, so someone has to take up the slack.

Kathy Scott, Victoria

SHARE

Comments



Powered By AdvocateDigitalMedia