Golden Trumpet is versatile addition to garden

By Linda Hartman - Victoria County Master GardenerEdited by Charla Borchers Leon
Aug. 24, 2017 at 10:30 p.m.
Updated Aug. 24, 2017 at 3 p.m.

Allamanda is a versatile tropical plant that loves sunshine, heat and humidity and can be grown as a free-standing shrub, vine or as a pot plant in our area.  It is sensitive to frost after what could be up to 10 months of blooms. Shown here flowing over a fence in a garden, it can require pruning to curtail its aggressive spread.

Allamanda is a versatile tropical plant that loves sunshine, heat and humidity and can be grown as a free-standing shrub, vine or as a pot plant in our area. It is sensitive to frost after what could be up to 10 months of blooms. Shown here flowing over a fence in a garden, it can require pruning to curtail its aggressive spread.   Contributed Photo for The Victoria Advocate

It is hot and humid with an abundance of sunshine, but we should be pleased for there are many plants in which gardeners may enjoy in our area.

Versatile addition to garden or patio

One such plant is the Allamanda, aka, the golden trumpet vine, which will provide beautiful yellow blooms for months. It is fairly drought-tolerant - good news for gardeners.

Shrub, vine or pot plant

The golden trumpet can be a versatile addition to anyone's garden or patio. Originally found in South America, this plant may be grown as a shrub or a vine or a pot plant. Since it does best in a warm tropical climate, the golden trumpet will certainly do well in our area.

Other trumpet vines will have reddish to orange blossoms while the golden trumpet will have 3- to 5-inch tubular yellow blossoms. Like other trumpet vines, it may be purchased locally.

Beautiful and attractive but toxic to humans/pets

Beautiful to view and attractive to hummingbirds, bees and butterflies - but caution should be taken as all parts of this plant are toxic to humans and often cause irritation to the skin. Animals can be affected as well. Take special care with pets, particularly if ingested.

Deciduous vine resprouts from winter

The golden trumpet will do well in full sun to partial shade and will need protection in winter. This perennial vine is deciduous, and will lose its leaves in the winter. The stems will maintain their structures and will resprout from existing stems and trunks.

Not fussy about where to live

The golden trumpet will happily drape itself over a retaining wall or fence, on an arbor or cling to a trellis. A hanging basket or a planter with the golden trumpet cascading down the sides should make a bright addition to one's patio or deck. This colorful plant may also be grown as a free-standing shrub in your yard.

It also can be found in a dwarf variety that grows well in the ground or in a container. View its

characteristics, growing requirements and landscape possibilities in the adjoining material included with this article.

Allamanda can be an aggressive vining plant with a spreading habit. Regular pruning with clean clippers may be needed to maintain its shape. Wearing garden gloves followed by a soap and water cleaning to hands and arms will help to prevent skin irritation.

Love those blooms for up to 10 months

Pinching the stems on new growth from March to early May will encourage the production of more blooms and more foliage. Using a good granular fertilizer about 3 times a year with the first feeding in April or May will enhance its growth.

After blooming, prickly seed pods will follow with winged seeds which will float on the breeze to begin a new plant. In our area a gardener may expect flowers for up to 10 months, but don't be surprised when a 40-50 degree temperature will cause the plant to drop its leaves.

Living inside

Allamanda aka golden trumpet may also be a house plant. The potting medium should be equal parts of peat, compost and soil, and will require four or more hours of bright sunlight.

Since the golden trumpet does not like "wet feet," the plant should be placed in a saucer filled with small rocks and water.

Do not feed until April, and when the outside temperature is above 60 degrees, it will be time to move it outside.

Propagate, just in case

If we could predict the weather, we gardeners would be in "gardening heaven." To ensure that one will always have the Allamanda aka golden trumpet, it might be a good idea to propagate some new plants using these suggestions:

1. Remove a 4-6 inch stem and cut above a bud.

2. After dipping the stem in a rooting hormone, plant it in a 4-inch pot filled with well-drained, well-aerated potting soil.

3. New cuttings will require even moisture and indirect light.

4. Cover with a plastic bag to increase humidity which will help with the rooting.

5. Before transferring to a permanent site, check for pests and disease as young plants are the most susceptible to problems.

6. After the plant is established, remember to feed it with good granular fertilizer 3 times a year. Bushes should be placed 3 feet apart.

Distinctively its own

Do not confuse Allamanda aka golden trumpet with esperanza or yellow bells, or Carolina jessamine or angel's trumpet for it is a special plant on its own.

One day, I will hear the trumpets in heaven, but for now I will enjoy my golden trumpets in my garden.

The Gardeners' Dirt is written by members of the Victoria County Master Gardener Association, an educational outreach of Texas A&M AgriLife Extension - Victoria County. Mail your questions in care of the Advocate, P.O. Box 1518, Victoria, TX 77901; or vcmga@vicad.com.


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