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Texas institutions of higher learning are good investment

July 14, 2017 at 5:21 p.m.
Updated July 15, 2017 at 1 a.m.

University Houston-Victoria sophomore Kelsey Hicks, 20, looks for Fannie Flagg's Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Shop Cafe in the literature section on the third floor of the campus library.

University Houston-Victoria sophomore Kelsey Hicks, 20, looks for Fannie Flagg's Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Shop Cafe in the literature section on the third floor of the campus library.   Angela Piazza for The Victoria Advocate

Editor, the Advocate:

The Victoria Advocate editorial on July 9, "Education gets lost in the equation," that discussed the difficulties legislators face in trying to address the problem of adequately funding public education in Texas was very good as far as it went; however, if there was a hint of a solution to the problem, I failed to see it.

As a start, a mix of an income tax dedicated to funding education combined with property taxes might help, but income taxes are probably legislative nonstarters, so the only near term hope is an increase in funding out of general revenues (really a return to previous state funding levels).

Walter Williams' column on the same page is not helpful. His seeming intense dislike of colleges (including administrators, faculty and students) may give local readers a mistaken view of campus cultures in Texas. This may cause people to believe that spending more on education is money down the drain. There are problems and challenges facing institution of higher learning, but in Texas at least, most of the colleges and universities are working hard to provide an education that is worth the return on the investment of time and money.

John Ferguson, Victoria


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