Youth Market Auction 2020

Neal Stevenson places a bid during the market auction at the 2020 Victoria Livestock Show.

Buyers at the Victoria Livestock Show will be allowed to place bids on high quality cattle, lambs and more from the dome and virtually at this year's auction.

Capacity will be limited to 400 people during the livestock show's auction at the Victoria Community Center, 2905 E. North St., because of the coronavirus. This means families and other observers will not be able to watch the buying and selling of the 75th annual livestock show in person this year.

But for those wanting to place a bid from outside the dome, first year auction chair Sara Perry said an online bidding company will create the opportunity for in-the-moment bids of in-person and online buyers. An online link to view the auctions will also be made available on the Victoria Livestock Show's website.

While some buyers will be in attendance and others will not, all bids will be made at the same time.

With the new system in place, Perry said she doesn't think the auctions will down from previous years.

Perry, who will work the auctions alongside her husband Jeff Perry, said she believes the process will go well because a bidding company is being used, rather than the livestock show setting up their own online bidding system.

The Perrys plan to make the auction a "personable experience for the buyers" by touching base with each one before the auctions begin and offering assistance via email at auction@victorialivestockshow.com.

Registration begins at 3 p.m. and a barbecue meal will be catered before the auctions, which begin at 4:30 p.m. March 1. Tables and chairs will still be available for the buyers, said former auction chair and livestock show treasurer Shelly Marbach. The auctions are expected to end at about 9 p.m. or 9:30 p.m.

Marbach said add-ons will still be available for those who do not place a bid but want to financially support participants.

Much of those add-ons and auction purchases go toward local 4-H clubs and scholarships for their members.

"Ultimately, it's for the kids," Perry said. "Because it's really a family type situation when you're getting involved with 4-H and FFA. We're trying to teach kids a craft and trade."

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Geoff Sloan reports on business and breaking news in the Crossroads region. He received his Bachelor's in international relations with minors in journalism and French from Texas State University. Reach him at gsloan@vicad.com or @GeoffroSloan on Twitter.

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Business Reporter

Geoff Sloan reports on business and breaking news in the Crossroads region. He received his Bachelor's in international relations with minors in journalism and French from Texas State University. Reach him at gsloan@vicad.com or @GeoffroSloan on Twitter.

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