Generic Years Ago

Years Ago Column.

1919

NOV. 10 – Victoria 50 years ago had a population of about 1,800 persons and the city limits were one mile square, Simon Levy, pioneer business man, said in his reminiscences today over 55 years of watching the city grow.

At one time the Boy Scouts had a flourishing organization in Victoria, but for the past year we have heard very little from them. We wonder if they have been disbanded or are just letting things drag along.

NOV. 13 – Dr. J.V. Hopkins was made an honorary member of the Victoria Fire Department and designated as its official physician. This was done as a slight token of esteem and gratitude in recognition of the unselfish service so faithfully rendered by Dr. “Joe” in the past.

1944

NOV. 12 – Pvt. Joseph J. Kandler of Victoria is a member of an antiaircraft battery which, following up infantry and armored outfits, moved into a section of Belgium to set up their guns, and was the target of a heavy aerial bombardment by the Luftwaffe.

We can save your tire casing if you give it moderate care and can add thousands of new miles by expert repairing and putting on new treads. If the Army can do it to help with the war, so can you. Allen Tire Recapping Service.

NOV. 16 – The necessity of a greater milk supply for the local air fields, and steps required to assure an increase, were discussed Wednesday by field authorities, milk producers, health department officials and business men gathered at the courthouse. Approximately 600 quarts a day would make up the shortage, according to Col. Stoyte O. Ross of Aloe Field. The shortage exists, said W.M. Howard, Gulf Health Department Sanitarian, despite an increased production in the area.

The first reported Victoria sportsman to bring in a buck today – opening of the deer and turkey season – was Paul Hanselman.

1969

NOV. 11 – Monday was moving day for Victoria Highway Patrolmen as they vacated their former offices in the basement of the county jail building for quarters at the new Department of Public Safety Building on the Hallettsville Highway.

Mrs. Frank Drozd, 1305 E. Power, is pretty good with a crochet needle. So good that she now has half a dozen ribbons to prove it. All are from the State Fair of Texas. This year Mrs. Drozd added a first premium blue ribbon to her collection.

NOV. 15 – For the second day in a row, a Missouri Pacific train and its crew experienced troubles Friday morning in getting through the Crescent Valley area. An Mp engine and three cars were derailed near Matchett Road, about a mile north from where the same engine struck a dump truck Thursday morning. Sand on the track was listed as the cause of the derailment.

1994

NOV. 11 – Dead grackles created a mess – and a mystery – Thursday morning at the intersection of Mockingbird Lane and Sam Houston Drive. A city animal control employee picked up about 20 birds from the roadway. All but one of the birds had been run over and could not be inspected for clues as to what caused the deaths. The one bird found intact was examined, but its body offered no clues to the mystery, according to Roberta Fisher with animal control. “This is just one of those weird things,” she said. If the deaths continue, a dead bird will be sent to a laboratory to determine if the deaths are caused by a chemical, she said. Representatives of the Victoria City-County Health Department, the Victoria Independent School District maintenance department and an area apartment complex said that they had taken no steps to kill grackles in the Mockingbird-Sam Houston area.

NOV. 14 – Showcasing regional art in airport terminals as a way to greet visitors and welcome home residents is one of the hottest trends in the country – and it’s coming to Victoria. Passengers at Victoria Regional Airport will soon be greeted by a large mural and sculpture created by Victoria artist Harold Nichols. The work was commissioned by the Victoria Convention and Visitors Bureau. Mona Foust, executive director, said the bureau wanted something different to replace the current convention and visitors bureau station at the airport, where visitors to Victoria can pick up information brochures about the area. “It wasn’t really about what we wanted,” Foust said. Foust thought art was the answer. “You have a lot of business people traveling and using the airport. Everything is so cut and dry in airports and we live in a stressful world,” Foust said. “The art is sort of soothing. I think any kind of art tends to do this,” Foust said. Foust said she approached well-known Victoria artist Harold Nichols about creating a piece of art for the airport terminal that would grab the attention of visitors to Victoria. Foust picked Nichols “because he is a local artist who works in a number of mediums and knows the history of Victoria. And I knew the quality of his work and the ideas he could come up with.”

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