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Celebrate

Cuero's Christmas in the Park grows even brighter

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Christmas in the Park

Cars enter the park during the annual Christmas in the Park event on Tuesday night at the Cuero Municipal Park.

CUERO — At five minutes to 6, a switch was flipped and more than 280 individual lighted displays blinked into life at Cuero Municipal Park.

In Cuero’s Christmas in the Park, a magnificent Nativity scene, graceful swans, towering pine trees and hundreds of other displays made of light illuminated a fixed route for visiting motorists to enjoy.

Christmas in the Park

A 17-piece Nativity scene illuminates the City of Cuero Lake during the annual Christmas in the Park event Tuesday night at the Cuero Municipal Park.

Christmas in the Park

A trio of ducks display illuminates the City of Cuero lake — and several live ducks — during the annual Christmas in the Park.

Christmas in the Park

Various light displays, including a dove, church, cross, star and poinsettias, illuminate the park during the annual Christmas in the Park.

The annual event opened the Monday of Thanksgiving week and will continue running until Jan. 1. The park is open every night from 6 to 10 p.m. and features special events including “Hot Chocolate Thursdays” and a live Nativity scene performed by the First United Methodist Church of Cuero on Sunday.

On Jan. 2, the Cuero Wellness Center will host its third “New Year. Fresh Start!” community walk or run through the park.

Greeting drivers toward the end of the route on Tuesday was a group of volunteers including Cuero City Secretary Jennifer Zufelt and Rhonda Stastny, who handed out peppermints to event goers.

Christmas in the Park

Motorists record the light displays on their phones.

Christmas in the Park

Motorists drive along the fixed route lined with hundreds of lighted displays.

Christmas in the Park

A massive Christmas tree display greets guests at the entrance of the park during the annual Christmas in the Park.

The two said this year’s Christmas in the Park featured more light sculptures than in any other year. A visitor count recorded by the Cuero Development Corp. indicates this year has seen more visitors than any previous and it’s expected to keep growing.

“It’s definitely grown since the very beginning. Definitely,” said Kim Ley, who has attended every Christmas in the Park since the tradition began in 2000 with the lighting of the Cuero Municipal Park gazebo.

Taylor Watson agreed, adding she couldn’t immediately give the number of times she’s visited because it has been so many.

New this year is a parking area toward the end of the route where guests can take pictures in front of several particularly impressive light installations and benches in the shape of snowmen.

Christmas in the Park

Light displays greet drivers along U.S. 87 during the annual Christmas in the Park.

Christmas in the Park

A motorist passes beneath an arch of lighted poinsettias toward the end of the route during the annual Christmas in the Park.

Christmas in the Park

Sassy the Sea Serpent and the mermaids displays light up the City of Cuero Lake during the annual Christmas in the Park.

Christmas in the Park

Motorists make their way through the park during the annual Christmas in the Park.

Christmas in the Park

A driver heads through an illuminated arch.

Christmas in the Park

Drivers pass underneath an illuminated poinsettia arch during the annual Christmas in the Park.

Christmas in the Park

Several light displays glow on the edge of the City of Cuero Lake during the annual Christmas in the Park.

Christmas in the Park

Twelve Days of Christmas display sits along the route during the annual Christmas in the Park.

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Duy Vu is the photo editor for the Victoria Advocate. You can reach him at 361-574-1204.

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I'm a staff photojournalist at the Victoria Advocate. I was raised in Virginia and went to the University of Oregon School of Journalism and Communication.

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